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Post-Workout Healthy Snacks

Please share some examples of slow carb release post-workout healthy snacks please (I’m diabetic).
Thanks, Maxine

Hi Maxine:
I’m currently studying for my Nutrition Specialist certification, so I will do my best to give you some general information about slow (and fast) release carbs.

Fast release carbohydrates are foods that are quickly broken down into sugars.
Slow release carbs are foods that are slowly broken down into sugars.

strawberries and blueberries

Glycemic response refers to the body’s increase in blood glucose (a simple form of sugar; if you see the word “monosaccharide,” that is the type of sugar that is glucose) and insulin after you eat.
As you’re diabetic, I imagine the insulin/ blood glucose terminology is familiar to you, but this quick definition is my way of leading you down the non-sugary path to the Glycemic Index (GI). The GI is a standardized list of food categories. Using white bread as the reference food (GI of 100), foods that have a GI >85 are considered high, foods that are 60-85 are moderate, and foods that are  <60 are low. Low Glycemic Index foods are slow release.

 

pic of healthy brain foodsI cannot advise you specifically what foods to eat, as that’s out of my scope of practice, but I can certainly tell you some of the foods listed as low (<60) on the GI.

lentils

hummus

peaches

apples

grapefruit

peanuts

pears

beans

oat bran bread

milk (whole or nonfat or soy)

yogurt

dried peas

egg fettuccini

apricots

bananas

wheat kernels

cherries

plums

tomato soup

rice

bran barley

For a truly complete list of over 1,300 food listed on the Glycemic Index, you can click to the International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002 published by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Handy hint – you won’t want white bread, I’m thinking.

Healthy packed dried fruits and veggiesWhat you choose from the Low GI Foods will also depend on what type of exercise you did, duration of that exercise, and intensity. And of course, your personal taste. I know I’d find it a lot easier to eat some cherries after working out than stashing tomato soup in my gym bag. But I wouldn’t say no to a bowl of egg fettuccini if someone else prepared it for me. But then, who wants plain fettuccini. Guess I’ll go look up the GI of butter and garlic.

In case you don’t carry the Glycemic Index list around with you, I’ll give you a super simplified way to choose – if it’s white, you probably don’t want it (except milk). If it’s colorful, you probably do. Brightly colored children’s cereals do NOT qualify slow release, even though they are probably the brightest food around.

picture of white foodsOne more way to quickly gauge – starchy = fast release; non-starchy – slow release. But I find the white/ colorful easier.

Now I’m hungry for some kale, carrots, plums and almonds, all mixed in with my steel-cut oats. Or something along those lines. I wonder where red licorice falls on the index???

Alexandra Williams, MA

Photo credit for white foods: Sharon Drummond via CreativeCommons.org