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8

5 More Healthy Food Trends

In our recent post “5 Healthy Food Trends,”  I listed five of ten nutrition trends that are driven by consumer preferences. As promised in that post, you can now read the other five from my article “10 Nutrition Trends to Watch,” for IDEA Fitness Journal.

I’ve excerpted from that article below, and if you want access to the full piece, please contact IDEA – the health and fitness association – at 800 999-IDEA.

superfood hemp in cerealSuperfoods
What do moringa, hemp, algae, purple corn, red palm oil, reishi mushrooms, turmeric and maca root have in common? They have joined blueberries, cinnamon and ginger root as must-have superfoods.

High in antioxidant and vitamin content, these health-promoting foods have passed $130 billion in sales. At the recent Natural Products Expo it was common to find people at booths tasting moringa protein drinks, turmeric rice, ginger hummus, and purple corn cereal.

Gluten-Free
Twenty percent of Americans say they actively try to eat gluten-free foods in their diets, and sales of gluten-free foods increased by 63% between 2012 and 2014. According to the poll, “Far more U.S. adults say they actively try to include gluten-free foods in their diets than actually suffer from celiac disease.” People with celiac disease or wheat allergies have to eat a gluten-free diet, as they cannot tolerate gliadin and glutenin, the two proteins found in gluten.organic gluten free sprouted popcorn. member of Organic Trade Association

Sugar Substitutes
Sweets will probably never go out of style, but sweeteners sometimes do. The demand for “natural” plant–based sweeteners is currently driving the market, and a few have moved up to the front row lately. Monk fruit, stevia leaf, and erythritol are just three substitutes rocketing up in popularity.

Wine is 1 of 5 healthy food trends. Are the other 4 as intriguing? Click To Tweet

Wine
You might say wine has always been in style, yet recent research about resveratrol has made red wines even more popular. Some preliminary research also shows that resveratrol can prolong life for mice and pigs, although this benefit has not been tested in people. Other research shows that it can help prevent heart disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s and diabetes—all diseases of great importance to the market drivers, Boomers. Besides, WINE!!!

Other Beverages
Combinations that would have been considered “weird” a few years ago are now found in refrigerators everywhere. For example, Uncle Matt’s Organic Juice now has orange turmeric juice, while REBBL makes tonics and elixirs such as ashwagandha chai and reishi chocolate coconut milk. Bulletproof and nitro cold-brew coffee are amping people up, bone broth has moved from the soup bowl to the tea cup, drinks based on roots and trees (neem, anyone?) are vying with coconut milk for shelf space, and flavored kombucha is now mainstream. Bolthouse Farms has a new line of cold-pressed juices, and Orgain produces an organic cafe mocha nutritional shake with ingredients that include grass-fed milk proteins, brown rice syrup, sunflower oil, kale, beets and açai.

dandelion mocha teeccinoHaving just spent several days at the Natural Products Expo West, I am energized by the growth in demand for foods, products and services that help, not harm our health (both corporeal and environmental). Look for an upcoming post that focuses specifically on organic products. Some of the statistics will surprise (and alarm) you.

Alexandra Williams, MA

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7

5 Healthy Food Trends

Some say abs are made in the kitchen, others say they’re made in the gym. My abs were actually made by my parents, though I’ve managed to take good care of their creation through healthy food and exercise.

As I just had my article, “10 Nutrition Trends to Watch” published in IDEA Fitness Journal – the magazine for fitness professionals (you can call 800 999-IDEA to order a copy if you aren’t a member) – I thought I’d share five of those trends with you and a few excerpts from the feature.

plumsFoods for Healthy Aging and Brain Power
Confirmed links between food, aging and brain health have exploded over the past few years. In 2012, Americans spent about $30 billion on health supplements, so it’s obvious we want to improve (Lara 2014). Boomers are hitting retirement age and wanting to stay active, engaged and youthful, so it makes sense that this demographic superforce would look to food for help with that.

Local, Sustainable Foods
For many years, our access to food has been based on a global model in which food would travel long distances to arrive on our tables. Interestingly, as the world has become even more global thanks to the Internet, consumers have pushed for a system that returns to agrarian times—eating food that is grown and produced locally.

fruit and yogurt parfaitMilk Products
Weight-conscious consumers have shunned whole milk since the 1980s, so it may surprise some to learn that it’s making a comeback (Shanker 2015). Higher consumption of butter, cream and high-fat milk correlates to lower levels of central obesity (waist-to-hip ratio ?) (Kratz, Baars & Guyenet 2013). The resurgent interest in whole-milk products includes some staples and also some newcomers, such as creamy yogurt, savory yogurt (aka labneh), cheese, whey protein, quark and farmer’s cheese.

We're getting about 1/3 of our daily kcals from snacks. But are they healthy snacks? Click To Tweet

Rise of Online Healthy Food Boutique Memberships
From ready-made meals to single packages of paleo jerky treats, healthy foods are reaching consumers quickly from both national and local companies.
Thrive Market is a fairly new online marketplace that recruited more than 2 million registered users in 2015. It’s the fastest-?growing e-commerce company in the history of Los Angeles, and I myself shop at it. They give one free membership to a family in need for every paid membership, and I have a link for you in case you wish to join – you get 30 days for free.

logo for Thrive MarketHealthy Snacks
According to a recent survey, Americans are getting about one-quarter of their daily calories from snacks, and consumers are paying attention to the items they choose (USDA 2014). Not only are people more particular about their snacks; they’re also willing to try new things, including bottled, potable soups; meat snacks, especially if they bear the “grass-fed, hormone-free” label; and whole and sprouted grains in items ranging from hot cereals to raw protein bars. Cakes, candies, chips and cookies are still quite popular, yet a long-term shift toward healthier snacks has occurred (Conick 2015).

Stay tuned for a future post, when I’ll share the other five trends from the article. Till then, grab your turmeric and kale chips and go for a walk. Me, I’m off to make some popcorn with red palm oil, coconut oil, hemp seeds and salt. It’s really quite delicious.

Alexandra Williams, MA

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18

The “Best” Foods to Eat Before a Workout

Every quarter for the past 21 years my university students ask me the same question – What should I eat before my workout? And every quarter my answer is essentially the same – The closer to the ground, the better.

Of course, the full answer is more nuanced.

Annie's tomato soup & crackersFor those interested in complex answers (and complex carbohydrates), I share information about slow and fast release carbs. Fast release carbohydrates are foods that are quickly broken down into sugars. Slow release carbs are foods that are slowly broken down into sugars.

And some like to know about the glycemic response, which refers to the body’s increase in blood glucose (a simple form of sugar. If you see the word “monosaccharide,” that is the type of sugar that is glucose) and insulin after you eat. The Glycemic Index is a standardized list of food categories. Using white bread as the reference food (GI of 100), foods that have a GI >85 are considered high, foods that are 60-85 are moderate, and foods that are <60 are low. Low Glycemic Index foods are slow release.

Food for Life Cinnamon BreadSome foods listed as low (<60) on the GI:

hummus                             peaches                        apples

grapefruit                           peanuts                        pears

beans                                  oat bran bread            milk (whole or nonfat or soy)

yogurt                                 dried peas                    egg fettuccini

apricots                              bananas                       wheat kernels

cherries                              plums                           tomato soup

rice                                      bran barley

For a truly complete list of over 1,300 food listed on the Glycemic Index, you can click to the International Table of Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load Values: 2002 published by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

In case you don’t want to memorize the Glycemic Index list, I’ll give you a super simplified way to choose – if it’s white, you probably don’t want it (except milk). If it’s colorful, you probably do. Brightly colored children’s cereals do NOT qualify. One more way to quickly gauge – starchy = fast release; non-starchy – slow release. But I find the white/ colorful easier.

Now let’s talk about carbohydrates and protein. These sample pre-workout choices give you a good idea when you’re trying to decide:

Nest Fresh nonGMO, organic, free range eggswhole-grain toast and peanut butter
orange and cottage cheese
yogurt and granola
nuts and apple
hard-boiled egg and wheat bagel
chicken breast (not a nugget) and rice
string cheese and pretzels

Notice how these foods are much closer to the ground than fruit-flavored or infused foods, and that the ingredients ARE the food, rather than a long list of mystery chemicals and additives.

In a nod to my fabulous self, my students also ask what I eat. They know that I have a lot of energy, good skin color, and am the right size for my health and build.

I got lucky. When my (now 18-year-old) son was diagnosed as a baby with a lot of food allergies, I had to learn to read labels and cook from scratch. So in order to protect his health I ended up protecting the health of my entire family.

We eat organic, non-GMO food from brands we trust. And for a while I had a fruit orchard and vegetable garden. On a side note, my skin and body care and make-up products have to be free of toxic chemicals too. What goes on your skin goes into your body. If you want to experience this for yourself, rub a clove of garlic on your bare big toe. Wait a few minutes, then check your breath. Weird, eh?

Thrive Market Want to make it really easy on yourself so you can avoid shopping at five different stores or growing your own food? Shop at Thrive Market. Think of the baby if Costco and Whole Foods combined to birth only their best features – low annual fee, free shipping (over $49), a focus on organic and natural products, wholesale prices, and great customer service. Plus, they donate one membership to a low-income family for every purchased membership. The founder is a young guy who grew up with a financially struggling single mom, and he wants to pay it forward so that everyone, not just the upper middle class, can access healthy food and products. Now don’t you want to hug him?

I joined their affiliate program because they reflect my values AND are super affordable. I’ll end this post with an invitation to click on this link to Thrive Market and see for yourself.

Thrive Market adYou want to eat the right food before exercise, right? And I imagine you want to eat the right food the rest of the day too, yes? Use the info and resources in this post and you’ll be just dandy. Especially if you buy organic candy.UnReal PB cups

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While you’re at it, I do a lot of videos around Santa Barbara via my AlexandraFunFit Periscope account, so you might like to follow me.

by Alexandra Williams, MA

10

Post-Workout Healthy Snacks

Please share some examples of slow carb release post-workout healthy snacks please (I’m diabetic).
Thanks, Maxine

Hi Maxine:
I’m currently studying for my Nutrition Specialist certification, so I will do my best to give you some general information about slow (and fast) release carbs.

Fast release carbohydrates are foods that are quickly broken down into sugars.
Slow release carbs are foods that are slowly broken down into sugars.

strawberries and blueberries

Glycemic response refers to the body’s increase in blood glucose (a simple form of sugar; if you see the word “monosaccharide,” that is the type of sugar that is glucose) and insulin after you eat.
As you’re diabetic, I imagine the insulin/ blood glucose terminology is familiar to you, but this quick definition is my way of leading you down the non-sugary path to the Glycemic Index (GI). The GI is a standardized list of food categories. Using white bread as the reference food (GI of 100), foods that have a GI >85 are considered high, foods that are 60-85 are moderate, and foods that are  <60 are low. Low Glycemic Index foods are slow release.

 

pic of healthy brain foodsI cannot advise you specifically what foods to eat, as that’s out of my scope of practice, but I can certainly tell you some of the foods listed as low (<60) on the GI.

lentils

hummus

peaches

apples

grapefruit

peanuts

pears

beans

oat bran bread

milk (whole or nonfat or soy)

yogurt

dried peas

egg fettuccini

apricots

bananas

wheat kernels

cherries

plums

tomato soup

rice

bran barley

For a truly complete list of over 1,300 food listed on the Glycemic Index, you can click to the International table of glycemic index and glycemic load values: 2002 published by The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Handy hint – you won’t want white bread, I’m thinking.

Healthy packed dried fruits and veggiesWhat you choose from the Low GI Foods will also depend on what type of exercise you did, duration of that exercise, and intensity. And of course, your personal taste. I know I’d find it a lot easier to eat some cherries after working out than stashing tomato soup in my gym bag. But I wouldn’t say no to a bowl of egg fettuccini if someone else prepared it for me. But then, who wants plain fettuccini. Guess I’ll go look up the GI of butter and garlic.

In case you don’t carry the Glycemic Index list around with you, I’ll give you a super simplified way to choose – if it’s white, you probably don’t want it (except milk). If it’s colorful, you probably do. Brightly colored children’s cereals do NOT qualify slow release, even though they are probably the brightest food around.

picture of white foodsOne more way to quickly gauge – starchy = fast release; non-starchy – slow release. But I find the white/ colorful easier.

Now I’m hungry for some kale, carrots, plums and almonds, all mixed in with my steel-cut oats. Or something along those lines. I wonder where red licorice falls on the index???

Alexandra Williams, MA

Photo credit for white foods: Sharon Drummond via CreativeCommons.org