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Tag Archives for " Midlife Women "

“The Other Talk”: Changing the Conversation about Postmenopause

The Other TalkAfter we reach age 50, are there still some things that mom knows best? Well, as you’ll see in this funny video “The Other Talk”, the answer is a resounding YES, especially when it comes to postmenopause.

“The Other Talk” uses the premise of ‘the talk’ recognized as a cultural event in life where mothers talk with their teenage daughters about sex. “The Other Talk” expands this coming of age tradition to the next generation with a hilarious take on how that conversation unfolds some 40 years later!

“Until recently, I was unaware that many women are uncomfortable or embarrassed to discuss symptoms of postmenopause, and therefore, suffer in silence,” says Emmy-nominated actress Brenda Strong, who is known for her role on Desperate Housewives and Dallas. “That’s why I welcomed the opportunity to work with Pfizer on the “Let’s Talk About Change” campaign to help transform the way we think and talk about postmenopause and empower women to take action to find relief.”

She also encourages women to take the following steps to help manage the physical changes that happen after menopause and change their mindset about aging and postmenopause.

CHANGE YOUR AWARENESS

Both menopause and postmenopause are a normal part of aging. Menopause is what happens when a woman’s menstrual period stops for 12 months in a row, typically around the age of 51. While each woman’s experience is different, some women experience symptoms such as hot flashes, trouble sleeping, night sweats, moodiness and urinary problems. However, postmenopause also brings changes to women’s bodies. Postmenopausal vaginal atrophy (or the thinning of vaginal tissues) can occur, and without treatment, symptoms can worsen. Symptoms may include: severe vaginal itching, burning and dryness, painful intercourse, urinary urgency, and painful urination.

CHANGE THE DIALOGUE

If you’re experiencing these postmenopausal symptoms, you’re not alone! Nearly one third of women experience these symptoms after menopause. To help find relief, it’s important to speak openly and honestly with your healthcare professional as well as your partner. Find some tips for starting these conversations here: Change the Dialogue.

CHANGE YOUR OUTLOOK

What else can you do to help manage the stress that can sometimes come with menopause and postmenopause? Laugh! Menopause is a normal, natural event—not a disease—so why not have a little fun with it? Check out “The Other Talk,” which features Strong to help raise awareness
about the symptoms of postmenopause and encourage women to speak up and take action to find relief.


Disclosure: I am participating in a VIN campaign for Pfizer. I am receiving a fee for posting; however, I am in no way affiliated with Pfizer and do not earn a commission or percent of sales. This post was written by Pfizer and supported and shared by Fun And Fit. 

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Exercise and Confidence in Midlife: I Am Enough

Alexandra Williams, MA
picture of RevRunWisdom of RunDMC at the BlogHer party

At the BlogHer Closing Party. Photo by Daniel Tsi Photography

This past weekend I was at BlogHer, a conference for women bloggers. Several events transpired that made me sad and fired up simultaneously. One – I went to a session for Boomer women; and Two – I chatted with a “magic” mirror at a booth about empowering women.

 

 

Boomer Mini-Con Session

A fairly free-flowing session at which attendees took turns at the mic asking questions and sharing information. One woman said she used to have a blog focused on health and fitness, but she had shut it down due to lack of readership. The next two women up to the mic commented about their need to lose weight. Major disconnect!

picture of magic mirror at The Mrs. Booth

Mirror, mirror on the wall, who’s the fairest of them all? You, of course.

The “I Am Enough” mirror at the Mrs. booth (a rock band comprised of midlife women).

You put on headphones, looked at the magic one-way mirror, and listened while the mirror told you all the reasons you are fantastic. As a person who doesn’t lack for confidence, I started dancing and telling the mirror all the reasons why I was fantastic. The mirror told me I was the first person to come up and share why I was enough (and awesome) as opposed to listening and/or crying. Upon reflection, it was rather sad to learn that I was the first (out of thousands) to say I was enough. Women, are we that hard on ourselves?

Take Ownership

selfie with Alexandra Williams and Roni Noone of Fitbloggin

Her tag line: One mom’s journey from fat to skinny to confident

The link between self-confidence and weight/ health is so strong that I am going to say something that is (for me) provocative. Take ownership. Do something about it. Complaining doesn’t count. Wishing doesn’t count. If you don’t have a medical issue that prevents you from moving your body (plus eating and sleeping right), then go move your body. Instead of saying, “I need to lose weight” or “I wish I could be more active,” say instead, “I choose not to,” because that’s what is really going on.

Of course, it’s all about small steps, as we’ve been saying for years right here on this very blog. And of course, progress is not in a straight line. And of course, we understand, as we are Boomers with stoopidhead metabolisms that changed 15 years ago too. But feeling good about yourself is in your control (again, I am not talking about those with medical issues). If you cannot march up to that magic mirror and tell it who’s boss, do something about it. This is a picture I took of my kind of celebrity – Roni Noone, founder of Fitbloggin, She has taken many steps – forward, backward, sideways – to get where she is, which is confident. Read this post by her about feeling more attractive and confident.

All the time, and especially at conferences with lots of women, I’m complimented on my energy level. I get my energy from exercising. I’m complimented on my good looks. I’m actually average looking, but I smile. That makes me look good. My smile is merely the outward reflection of my happiness with the efforts I make every day to make choices that get me to my goals. I’m complimented on how young I act and look. Am I special? Actually, yes. But so are you. As David McCullough told the graduating seniors at Wellesley High a few years back, “The sweetest joys of life, then, come only with the recognition that you’re not special. Because everyone is.” Too many of us believe the first sentence, yet remove ourselves from the second.

This is the part where I link to two well-written conference opinion pieces by women I like who just happen to have fun blackmail pics of me.  Some of my so-called youthful appearance is due to my hair stylist, and some is due to oily teenage skin, but the rest is due to my rejection of our culture’s “rules” for Boomer women. I enjoy my life. I like people. I am a person. So I like me. And I definitely want you to like you. All of you, not just parts.

So if you eat crap and don’t want to, don’t. If you are overweight and unhealthy and think you should exercise, do it. It’s not about willpower; it’s about choices. Small ones throughout the day that add up. What choices are you going to make that will allow you to march right up to that magic mirror and say, “I’m more than enough; I am awesome?”

A little plug for the AARP Care4YouToo contest – For free, you can join the fitness contest (with prizes) that is now in week 3 of 6. Each week can be stand-alone, so you are not behind if you join now. Get suggestions and support as you make the incremental steps I mentioned above. 

 

22

What’s Beautiful? Health at Any Age

Alexandra Williams, MA

How do you define beauty? Does it have age parameters? Size parameters? Is one skin shade preferable to another? Is your mental image tied up with the word “skinny?” More importantly, is your self-image affected (probably negatively) by your wish to be beautiful, even though that term is so nebulous that it can differ from person to person, and culture to culture?

What's Beautiful? Me!Kymberly and I were invited to be part of the sponsored “What’s Beautiful” campaign by Under Armour and FitFluential (in this case, this means we are being sent free Under Armour apparel to wear for the challenge). I cannot speak to Kymberly’s goals or reasons for accepting the invitation (her internet is down, so her post is a-coming), but I took them up on it because I want my midlife Boomer voice to be heard when it comes to determining what beauty is.
Essentially, Under Armour has an 8-week campaign for women who want to create a goal or challenge, and we document our progress. A few of the women can win prizes, and I like winning, but my actual motivation is to show as many women as possible that beauty is not confined to the first half of the lifespan. In truth, I am acutely aware that the previous winners are all young, which either means only young women can win…or no older women are doing the challenge. So, Boom, Alexandra Quixote here to tilt at the windmill!

My video should enlighten you beyond belief, so please watch it!

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jLEzjE7pHDI[/youtube]

If you didn’t watch this very short video (why didn’t you?), then you don’t know that I believe beautiful to be health-related. As I put in a tweet today, if you are healthy, confident, happy, have energy, friends, and are kind, you are truly beautiful. Nothing at all related to age.

That being said, I want to ask your help. For the What’s Beautiful campaign we had to choose a goal. I chose to hike up the steep, winding road that goes from the city below, up near the top of the mountain where I live. You can simply follow my progress by hitting the Follow button on my What’s Beautiful profile (you might have to sign in via Facebook), or if you want to climb your own personal hill (sure, it can be metaphorical), then please join my team “Up Yours: Hill, That Is” so we can encourage each other and share our progress. I plan to hike approximately 7 miles, going from bottom to top, then back down (where my car will be waiting for me). If you want to join my “Up Yours: Hill, That Is” team, you can choose whether you want to hike up an actual hill or overcome an obstacle that’s between you and better health. I especially welcome Boomer women (and their daughters).

IMG_3352

The more color, the more fun. Proven by research…that I made up

Late last year I did a different What’s Beautiful challenge (unofficially; I didn’t compete) entitled Challenge Yourself to a Healthier You, and I hope you read it. I won’t tell you what challenge I picked for myself, but I will say that I did accomplish it and realized that I am Awesome and Amazing in the process!

The official description of this year’s What’s Beautiful campaign: a community and a competition to redefine the female athlete. Under Armour invites YOU to aim high and declare a goal in their What’s Beautiful competition. Complete challenges and share your journey; join teams if you like for additional challenges, support and motivation.

Please click the link above to follow my What’s Beautiful profile, as well as the one to join my Up Yours team. With your help and encouragement, I will get to the top! More importantly, all the exercise will keep me healthy and beautiful for the next 50 years. If you don’t agree, piss off! Wait, maybe I should have said “Up Yours!”

After the hike back down the Pass

 

Before the hike up the Pass

Before the hike up the Pass

What is your definition of beauty?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tote that bale, lift that load, and climb that hill to subscribe to our YouTube channel to see short videos that will improve your fitness. Have you subscribed yet to our blog? Please also follow us on google++Alexandra and +Kymberly, on Twitter: AlexandraFunFit and KymberlyFunFit and Instagram: KymberlyFunFit and AlexandraFunFit. Or click now on the icons above.