Tag Archive

Tag Archives for " 21 year old "
6

Fitness Advice from a 50 year old Mom to her 21 year old Daughter: Guest Post from Taylor Leandro

Intern Taylor LThis guest post comes from Taylor Leandro, our dedicated and hardworking intern. Originally from Fremont, California, Taylor is an undergraduate student at the University of California, Santa Barbara studying Communication and Psychology. She is interested in education, health, and counseling. When she’s not at school or studying, she likes to swim, as she was a competitive swimmer for over 8 years.  Keep Taylor in mind if you are looking to hire a quality future employee!

Taylor: As I approach my fourth year at the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB), I find the topic of “life after college” consuming my mind more and more. Three years ago my main concern was not gaining the dreadful “freshman 15.”  Now I am focused on obtaining a full-time job. I am beginning to wonder how I am going to find time to stay fit as I start to work exhausting, 8-hour shifts that leave me with little to no energy to exercise or eat healthy.

After the day to day demands of full time, working, adult existence, it is easy to lose sight of the importance of nutrition and health. I currently lead an active college lifestyle that includes riding my bike to and from school, walking around town as opposed to driving, walking or running to the beach, and even exercising at my school’s gym. What am I going to do once my stress levels increase and my activity decreases (or once I don’t have a free membership to a campus gym)?

So I asked my mom, who is fit and active, what advice she has for me as I get ready to launch my career in a year. I hope her advice works for you as well, whether you are my age or my mom’s.

Taylor’s mom: First, understand the correlation between stress and weight gain.

Eat rightSushi from Tenaya

If less time is going to be spent on exercising, then more time needs to be focused on eating healthy. Prepare meals for work instead of going through the fast food drive thru for that 800 calorie double cheeseburger with extra cheese and bacon (or shall I say, heart attack).

Add exercises or resistance into your daily activities

This can be as simple as taking the flight of stairs instead of the elevator or wearing weights around the house.

(Note from Kymberly and Alexandra: we suggest you put such weights in a backpack so that the weight is evenly distributed. We do not recommend ankle or wrist weights as they tend to stress joints).

Find an exercise partner

Taylor Leandro at NPEW

Better with a Buddy

A friend or workout partner can keep you motivated on those days off when you just want to sit around and do nothing. You’re less likely to bail on them than you are to bail on yourself.

Get into a routine

Make exercise part of your daily routine so it becomes a habit. For example, exercise for 30 minutes after work every day. Once you are in the groove of staying active, you will feel good and won’t berate yourself on those occasional days you skip a workout.

Practice yoga or meditation

This can help to decrease stress levels when adult life becomes too hectic. Even just 10 minutes a day to clear the mind and lower cortisol levels helps with overall well-being.Buddha meditating

Readers: What exercise advice would you give your child, grown or not. What advice would you give your younger self about working out and getting fit?