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2

Morro Bay – More, More, More, How Do You Like It

If you’re a Boomer, you’ll probably now and forever more associate Morro Bay with Andrea True Connection’s 1976 “More More More.” As I sit here eating salt water taffy from Crill’s, I know I could have had more than three days in Morro Bay.

Morro Bay Rock

The Morro Bay Rock is a volcanic plug that sits at the juncture of the ocean and the estuary.

At the invitation of the tourist bureau last week, I drove up with my younger son and sister Kymberly for a mini-vacation to Morro Bay, with the AMGEN Stage 3 Men’s bicycle race as our excuse to visit a place that’s only a few hours’ drive from both L.A. and San Francisco (only 1 1/2 hours from Santa Barbara).

AMGEN stage 3 race Morro Bay

And the winners of the AMGEN Stage 3 race arrive in front of the VIP section at the finish line in Morro Bay.

Morro Bay in Central California has More, More, More of everything you want in nature. #travel… Click To Tweet

Look for an upcoming post from Kymberly about the community bike ride we took the evening prior to the pro race.

Boats at dock across from our hotel in Morro Bay.

We stayed at the 456 Embarcadero Inn & Suites, right on the beach, but that wasn’t even the best part. The best part was the customer service. The owner was super friendly and smiley, which set the tone for the entire staff. Definitely stay there when you go.

Low tide in the Morro Bay estuary

Super low tide in the estuary, with the Morro Bay Rock in the background.

Kayaking in Morro Bay

Our kayaking guide was the owner of Central Coast Outdoors, and she knew all the birds, wildlife, history, marine, and culture about Morro Bay and the estuary. She even showed us a harbor seal and her pup. Important hot tip: When you go to Morro Bay, eat some of the oysters from the two local oyster companies. After your kayaking adventure.

Morro Bay near Dorn's Restaurant

With my son after we ate dinner at Dorn’s Original Breakers Cafe. I’m smiling because I had delicious scallops for dinner.

Sea lion on the dock at Morro Bay

Can you spot the extremely loud sea lion? He and I were the only ones awake at dawn, but he was determined to bark his loudest. It pays to get up early, as I also saw otters at play.

 

When we weren’t kayaking or bicycling or walking along the waterfront or eating seafood, we were shopping at the various thrift and consignment stores in town. Set aside some time for going up and down Morro Bay Boulevard, as we felt like we hit the jackpot in thrift store land.

North side of Morro Bay Rock

You can walk or drive out to the Rock at Morro Bay. On the north side is the beach. It was just past dawn and the fog was sitting just above the horizon.

 

view of San Luis Obispo from Morro Bay

Morro Bay Rock is the northernmost of 9 volcanic plugs in the area. Black Hill is just south of it, with a full 360 view of the area when you make the 10 minute climb to the top. Only a 5 minute drive from town, and you get this view of the estuary and San Luis Obispo.

 

Morro Bay Rock from the natural history museum

Locals refer to Morro Bay as “Three Stacks and a Rock.” You can see why in this photo taken from above the Natural History Museum in the State Park on the south end of town.

The town is small enough that you can walk or bicycle nearly everywhere, which probably comes in quite handy during the summer season. For us, in mid-May, parking was easy even with the bike race in town. We loved the small town feel and the friendliness of the locals. Even the otters seemed to enjoy showing off to us.

ACTION: For more pics of Morro Bay, follow their Instagram account. While you’re at it, follow mine too: AlexandraFunFit.

Text & Photos: Alexandra Williams, MA

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5

Tangerine Dream: It’s Pixie Month at The Oaks at Ojai Spa

It’s Pixie Tangerine season in Ojai, and we celebrated our love of the seedless fruit, the Oaks at Ojai spa treatments, and romance this past weekend.

chaise longuesJust to be clear, in this case, “we” was NOT my sister and I (see the part just there that mentions romance). Last year my sis and I went to the spa for Bike Week, so you can go for the active adventures, or wind down with spa treatments. Or both. This time I went for relaxation and spa treatments (you don’t have to be a guest to take advantage of the spa services, FYI).

For Pixie Month, my particular friend and I showed up in time for dinner, which included a Pixie mousse for dessert. Yes, you CAN get dessert at a fitness spa. Our goal was to relax after a busy week, so we took a short stroll after dinner, then sat in the hot tub contemplating our good luck at having it all to ourselves.

Ojai Meadows Preserve

The Ojai Meadows Preserve is a 5-minute drive from the Oaks at Ojai.

frog

Five of these little froggies would fit in the palm of your hand

April is Pixie tangerine month at the Oaks at Ojai. Ready for your visit? Click To TweetAfter breakfast, which included as many Pixies as we could fit in our pockets, we drove to the Ojai Meadows Preserve for a hand-in-hand stroll, where we saw several hundred teeny tiny frogs. We were tempted by both the morning hike and the aqua class at the spa (I have done both in the past, and loved them), but we were focused on our “together” time, so chose solo activities instead.

serenity garden

Hidden behind the pool is a serenity rock garden. You can add your own!

By the time we got back to The Oaks at Ojai, it was time for our spa treatments. In my case, that meant a pixie pedicure. Yup, it included a foot and leg scrub infused with tangerines, plus a fresh tangerine squeezed into the foot soak water. I almost chose tangerine as my nail polish color, then decided to go with a merlot color. I’m sure both sound delicious. My friend had a massage, which I was surprised to learn was the first he’d ever had in his life. How is it possible that he made it into his fifties without ever having a massage? In any case, he loved it, including the hot stones, and now he knows what he’s been missing.

Lake Casitas

If you come from Santa Barbara, stop for the views of Lake Casitas

ABC Channel 7 did a piece about Pixie month and the Oaks at Ojai, which we recommend you watch. The spa is only 45 minutes away from Santa Barbara, and includes a scenic drive past Lake Casitas. If you’re coming from L.A., it’s only an hour’s drive.

Rachel at Oaks at Ojai

Don’t let that smile fool you; Rachel is just waiting to make you laugh

My little extra piece of advice? You can go for a girls’ getaway (some friends did that a week before our visit), or with a male partner. Some people think the Oaks at Ojai is just for women, but that’s not the case at all. There were a number of men there (though mine was the handsomest). And if you want to laugh, ask for Rachel at the front desk. She’s a hoot.

Alexandra Williams, MA

This is not a sponsored post, though I was a special guest at the spa for the night.

 

4

Bike Riding in Cologne Along the Rhein River

The Romans probably settled in Cologne (Köln in German) in 50 BC because they’d heard about the fantastic bike riding views along the Rhein River. Or because of its natural harbor. Either way.

Hohenzollern Bridge, CologneOne of the highlights of our October AmaWaterways cruise was the 11-mile, 2 1/2 hour guided bike ride along both the west and east sides of the river. We had two fluent English-speaking guides who took about 8 of us on an easily-managed bike adventure (everyone else was either part of the walking or beer tasting tour). We started our ride along the Rheingarten, a riverside park where pedestrians and bicyclists were out in force on a sunny (yet cold) weekend day. At first, we were riding fairly quickly, but when I said I wanted to stop for more photos, the guides were quite amenable. This I appreciated, or I would have gotten cranky.

We pedaled past the Chocolate Museum, which my sister noticed. Yes, we went back later to learn the history of chocolate, though we didn’t stop in the museum café to eat any of their 9,866 chocolate items. Um, I have no idea of the exact number, but I sure saw lots of options.

Cologne castle towerCologne is Germany’s fourth largest city, with over 1 million people, 45,000 of whom are university students. One fact I really liked was discovering that 18% of the inhabitants come from over 180 nations. Hmmm, probably easy to find a correlation between that and the reputation Cologne has for being a major cultural center.

You can take a bike tour of Cologne, Germany as part of a Rhein River cruise w/ @AmaWaterways?… Click To Tweet

crane buildings, CologneThough I prefer old buildings (castles are my thing, perhaps related to my Medieval Studies BA), I found the three “cranes” interesting. Two of them are office buildings, while the one with the balconies is apartments. Who wouldn’t want riverfront living, even if it’s shaped like a giant piece of machinery, eh?

Our guides stopped for a while on the Rodenkirchener Bridge so we could take pictures and drink water. When you’re on a bike, it feels like the vista is really expansive. We could see barges and pleasure boats going north and south beneath us. When we were onboard our ship, the Ama Prima, it always felt like we were moving at a leisurely pace, yet when standing on a bridge above the ships, they appeared to be speeding along.

locks of love, CologneOn the east side, away from the main part of the city, we felt like we were in the woods for a bit, as we rode by a fairly extensive campground. It’s probably jam-packed in summer, though we saw just a few campers in October. Perfect time to travel if you own a jacket and like to go when the city is not so crowded. From the east side, with its tennis and soccer (call it football if you want to sound truly cosmopolitan) fields, we had unimpeded views of St. Martin’s Church, the Cathedral, the Innenstadt, and Hohenzollern Bridge, which is where the Locks of Love are, and which leads to the Dom Platz.

St. Martin's, CologneAfter we crossed the bridge, our guides asked if we could figure out why security guards were preventing people from walking on the plaza. We had no idea. As it turns out, the Cologne Philharmonic is just below the plaza, and when they are performing, they keep people off the plaza to prevent extraneous sounds. So the floor is also the roof.

Cologne Cathedral interiorNear the end of the ride we stopped to admire the Cathedral. It’s a UNESCO World Heritage Site and is visible from fairly high up, which presented some issues during World War II. According to our guides, the Allies respected the history and cultural significance of it, so they intentionally avoided bombing it to ruins. Another story is that the pilots left it (for the most part) intact because it was an easy landmark for bombers to use to calculate their various targets. As well, the guides said that church representatives removed all the glass from the windows, which lessened the destruction from the bombs. On a cheerier note, the Cathedral was the tallest building in the world until the Eiffel Tower came along in 1887.

Bike riding, CologneThriller dance on Ama PrimaWe got back to the Ama Prima just in time to change for dinner (and an impromptu performance of “Thriller” by moi for all the passengers). No muscle soreness after 11 miles, either. Or should I say 18 kilometers, as that sounds even more impressive?!

 

 

 

 

 

Alexandra Williams, MA

photos by me

Have you read our post about all the castles and riesling in Rüdesheim yet? Better yet, have you subscribed to us?

 

4

Rüdesheim with AmaWaterways: Riesling, Castles and a Musical Cabinet Museum

Even if you cannot pronounce “Rüdesheim,” you’ll want to visit this picturesque German town that sits at the south end of the Rhein Gorge, a 41-mile section of the river that has the world’s greatest concentration of castles. A town of 7,000 people, all of whom apparently grow wine grapes, Rüdesheim’s history dates back to Roman times, as evidenced by some of the ruins in town.

Rudesheim on the Rhine

The medieval town of Rüdesheim on the Rhein

As part of our Rhein River cruise with AmaWaterways, we had an evening tour of Siegfried’s Mechanical Music Cabinet Museum (itself situated in the remains of the 12th century Brömserburg castle), followed by a 3-hour morning hike through family-owned vineyards that produce Riesling so popular it can command over 1,000 Euros per bottle.

Viola music instrument

These cabinets opened up and the violins began to play of their own accord. No other instrument in the museum was similar to this one.

One thing that is appealing about going on a river cruise with AmaWaterways is that you get loads of activity choices, all geared toward a variety of fitness levels and personal interests. When we docked in Rüdesheim after dinner, we had a choice of touring the music museum (which we discovered means the instruments are all self-playing) or relaxing in a cafe that serves Rüdesheimer coffee, known for its cream and brandy. AmaWaterways included a short sightseeing train ride from the ship into town, and if it’s raining, as it was when we arrived, you’ll be glad to hop aboard. In fine weather, it’s a short 10-minute walk.

Rüdesheim w/ @AmaWaterways: wine, castles and a musical cabinet museum Click To Tweet
Clown musical instrument in Rudesheim

One of my favorite instruments at the Mechanical Musical Instruments Museum

doll carousel music box, Rudesheim

This is a very small doll carousel music box at Siegfried’s Museum in Rüdesheim

door and wall at Siegfried's, Rudesheim

A well-preserved, colorful door and wall in the museum, built in 1542.

Arabian musical instrument, Rudesheim

Housed in the cellar, this wonderful floor-to-celing music box still works. All tours are guided, as the tour guide plays these instruments for guests.

Siegfried's Mechanical Musical Kabinet

Siegfried’s Mechanisches Musikkabinett on a rainy night in Rüdesheim

In the morning, the rain was no longer pouring, though it was still cloudy, so we stuck with our plan to hike to the ruins of Ehrenfels Castle via the vineyards. During the hike, we passed under the gondolas that took most of the group to the top of the hill to view the town and river. On our way back to our ship, the Ama Prima, we were passed by the people who took the third option – a 13-mile bike ride. One advantage (of many) of the hike is that the vintners keep a small fridge stocked with free wine along the hiking trail. So thoughtful. If it’s sunny, bring water and sunblock, as there’s little shade. We hiked in cloudy weather, and it was perfect, as we stayed warm without getting hot. Our tour guide was a retired civil engineer who owns a potato farm in Wiesbaden. Not only was his English fluent (as are all the local guides), he knew the history of all the families who owned the vines. He also admitted to being a bit of a snob who only buys Rüdesheim Riesling, not the Riesling made on the Bingen side of the river.

hills of vineyards in Rudesheim

Yup, we hiked up hill and over dale, through the vineyards of Rüdesheim.

grapes for Riesling

Riesling grapes in Rüdesheim

Riesling producers in Rudesheim

One of the families that owns wine grapes in Rüdesheim. Sadly, the bottle was empty.

bird in vineyards

This lovely bird was supervising us as we hiked through the vineyards. If you know what type of bird (falcon?) it is, please let me know.

Ehrenfels castle, Rudesheim

The ruins of Ehrenfels Castle, Rüdesheim, on a rainy day

Part of what made the meals served on the Ama Prima extra special is that the meal is based on the local specialties. So besides wine, those of us who huddled under blankets up on the sun deck (it was cold and rainy) to get pictures of the many castles we passed after leaving Rüdesheim were offered some of the Rüdesheim coffee. Remember how it has brandy? That helped keep me warm enough to stay up top to get pictures of every single castle we passed as we cruised downstream along the UNESCO World Heritage designated gorge. Those pictures will be in an upcoming post, so be sure to subscribe if you haven’t already.

We were guests of AmaWaterways on the 8-day “Enchanting Rhine” cruise. They made no requirements of us, except to enjoy ourselves, which we did, oh so much.

 

You CAN Go Home Again

Sis and I recently went back to our hometown for our 40th high school reunion. And what did we discover?! That you can go home again.

Manhattan Beach Pier

The Manhattan Beach Pier looks about the same as it did in 1976, except for the plaques honoring famous local volleyball players.

Well, sort of. We probably couldn’t afford to buy back into Hermosa Beach real estate prices, but we could definitely enjoy living there and rekindling many of our high school friendships.

Would you ever return to your hometown for a visit? #FitFluential #MidlifeBlvd Click To Tweet
Film lights in Hermosa Beach

A lot of film people live in Hermosa, so it’s no surprise to see movie lighting on the Strand.

Whether it’s a high school reunion or something else that draws you back to your hometown, I definitely recommend it if you have positive memories of the place, especially after 40 years. Prior to going to the evening reunion, we wandered around town a bit, taking a few pictures, and reminiscing about our past. Mostly I think we bored my niece with our “that’s where our dentist used to be,” and “this is the hill where I learned to skateboard” kind of narrative.

Mira Costa cookies

Mira Costa High School Mustangs – in cookie form at the 40th reunion.

sailboat off the Hermosa Beach pier

Sailboats on a warm day in Hermosa Beach, taken from the end of the pier.

In any case, enjoy these pictures from our stroll down Hermosa Beach Memory Lane. And let us know a memory or two from your high school days.

View to the north from the pier

View to the north of the Hermosa Beach Pier on a warm weekend day.

 

helicopter flying over lifeguard tower at the beach

22nd Street Beach is the beach where we hung out when we were kids.

Alexandra Williams, MA

4

Sightseeing Counts as Exercise

On a whim, I decided to take my son and a friend to Los Angeles for the day to do some sightseeing. It’s a 90-mile drive, which means about 4 hours in the car for the round trip (traffic willing), which is about the same amount of time I’ve spent sitting on a sightseeing tour bus when we go halfway around the world.

Venice Beach Canal BoatWhen I think of international sightseeing bus excursions, I usually focus on all the time spent sitting on the bus, which I equate with enforced passive activity (an oxymoron if ever there was one). Yet yesterday’s local excursion helped me realize that sightseeing can really mean quite a bit of walking, which is definitely exercise.

Farmers Market Los Angeles

The Grove by Farmers MarketOnce in Los Angeles, we first drove east toward downtown to visit Farmers Market, then we took Venice Blvd. west all the way to Venice Beach. We spent two hours at Farmers Market and The Grove (my son seems to like this place that feels like a combination of upscale shopping and Universal Studios), then another 2-3 hours walking on the boardwalk and pier at Venice Beach.

Canal in Venice, Los AngelesWhen you're sightseeing, it's easy to log more steps than you expected. #FitFluential Click To Tweet

By the time we got back in the car to head home, I had logged about 6 miles on my Charity Miles app, a fantastic FREE app that logs your walk, run or bike ride, then donates money to the charity of your choice (from their extensive list) based on the number of miles you completed. Win Win Win.

Crowd and building at Venice BeachThe next time you go on a sightseeing junket, near OR far, download the app or check your fitness tracker to see how much you’ve walked. If you’re like me, and feel like all you did was sit all day, you may be surprised. Six miles definitely counts as exercise. And my feet were ready for the car at about 5.5 miles, so that’s another sign that I was moving and logging those steps. Though next time maybe I should pay one of those strapping fellows who work out at Muscle Beach to carry me that last half mile.

View from Venice PierWhen did you last surprise yourself by discovering you had “accidentally” exercised more than you had expected?

When did you get a surprise when you last went traveling? Read about one of our unusual experiences. We survived. Barely: Hiking with the Leeches

Alexandra Williams, MA

6

Add Customer Service to Your Life

While spending a week at Rancho la Puerta resort I decided to focus my photo eye on themes – sculptures, peaceful settings, contemplation – which all sort of ended up being folded in one category – attention to detail. Once I started to seek out the details that make the spa consistently rated as one of the best spas in the world, I realized what was really going on, and that is customer service.

daily quoteIt all started when the lens broke on my good camera before I had even taken a single picture at the Ranch. My first reaction was to assume it was my own problem to deal with, as I was “only” a guest instructor, not a paying guest. That would have been a mistake, as the Ranch staff made sure to listen, then act to find a solution. The manager told me the options, gave me a realistic time frame, and a promise to keep me up to date. I went away feeling valued (this is also a good time to let you know that all photos in this post are from my iPhone due to that broken Canon).

Ranch statuesThat interaction on Day 1 made me decide to pay close attention to instances of Customer Service:

Listen / Pay Attention

Find a Solution

Customer Feels Valued

Places and people that are excellent at customer service are easy to overlook because they make it look so natural and seamless, which means it can go unnoticed. Of course, that’s the point most of the time, right?!

Do you know & practice the two components of customer service in your life? Click To Tweet

Rancho la Puerta landscapingLook For It

Once I consciously looked for examples of customer service, I realized I was surrounded by it. Staff on the Ranch always:

say hello every time they see you; from the concierge to the landscapers

step aside to let you pass on the pathways

remember that you like butter on your oatmeal and have it ready for you

help with special requests (such as picking up a particular piñata in a town 40 miles away)

pick up trash and keep all pathways clear so it’s easy to walk, especially at night

start and end classes on time

have hot water and coffee ready in the lounge areas (you will NOT find lukewarm water that ruins your tea)

ask how they can make your stay better

take guest feedback and act on it (from the fitness program to the garden sculptures to breakfast outdoors by the Villa Pool)

One example that really helped me understand why they are so consistently ranked as #1 involved a couple who came in to the front reception to ask how to build a fire in their room’s fireplace. The staff person asked if they would prefer to have the staff light the fire, what time, and how often? She then promised to send someone every day to light their fire in the evening. She could have answered their question literally and told them how to build the fire. Instead she answered their underlying desire by arranging for a daily fire.

villa at Rancho la PuertaProvide It

That got me to wondering how I could become better at creating customer service to my clients and students. Can I smile more? Can I ask how to be helpful more often? Can I anticipate their needs? Can I provide the extra “oomph” that creates a quality experience? It turns out I can do that. It’s not about feeling subservient; it’s about working as an equal to enhance our mutual experience. I’ll give some examples, and see if you think I hit the mark.

As part of the programming, I taught the choreography for Thriller for two dance classes for guests. They asked for an extra class to really “get” the choreography. Even though I could have declined with no backlash to me, I met with the students for an extra hour. They felt valued as guests, and I got an extra hour of practice while making friends.

During an interval class with treadmills, bikes and the elliptical machine, I brought water and towels to the guests as they got thirsty and sweaty. They didn’t have to stop their workout, and I felt good knowing I was helping them reach their fitness goals.

I memorized the names of a few of the most outstanding staff members, then found their managers to let them know about their excellence (and yes, I also leave tips).

plants at Rancho la Puerta

Sometimes the most obvious things, such as being kind or doing an extra little something, are the easiest to miss or skip. Yet how you spend your time shows what you value. If I spend my time providing customer service, that aligns with the fact that I value people and kindness. Tomorrow I plan to consciously seek out at least four opportunities to provide good customer service. Eventually it might become a habit. And who knows? Maybe my little ripple in the pond will create a ripple effect that brings a bit of light to someone who has too much darkness and needs that light. Hmmm, now that brings me to the philosophical question of whether altruism is inherently selfish. But that’s for another day. For now, let us know how YOU provide excellent customer service.

Rancho la Puerta quoteAlexandra Williams, MA

 

 

8

Top 10 Fitness Trends: Aging Actively is SOooo 2016

Top Ten Fitness Trends

And the Top 10 Fitness Trends are…

Who loves tracking fitness trends? (Besides my sis and me, though we’d love to think we start them). Are you a baby boomer fitness trendsetter or trendspotter? Perhaps you’re simply waiting to figure out what other women over 5o are doing that’s working so you know where to direct your exercise energy. Clever of you, for sure!

Time to Track Fitness Trends

It’s that time of year again when we track down workout, exercise, and fitness trends and fill you in. Why? So you can be your best, most actively aging, up-to-date you. Is that too much to ask?

Who loves spotting fitness trends? Especially for active women over 50 and baby boomers? Top 10… Click To Tweet
NACAD fitness trends talk at WAC

Thanks, I do feel welcomed. Now let’s trendset!

In prepping for a presentation on fitness trends for the North Atlantic Club Athletic Director Association’s conference held in Seattle at the Washington Athletic Club (WAC), I discovered a slew of predictions. The following promise to be of particular interest to actively aging midlife women:

Five that Jive and Keep us Alive

  1. Programs tailored to older adults.
  2. Functional fitness training — emphasis on moves and group classes that mimic or enhance activities of daily living, including balance, strength, and power.
  3. Wearable technology for many purposes — to measure physiological responses to training, track workouts, monitor caregiving of our aging parents, to name just a few examples.
  4. Experiences as a driving factor to exercise, not just working out to work out. Perhaps the biggest example is those of us who exercise in order to travel. Baby boomers are traveling like no generation before or currently. And we don’t want to sit on the bus, either! Midlife adventure travel is going up, up, up just like the airplanes carrying us to new destinations.
  5. Educational workshops for exercisers, who are looking for intellectual fulfillment as well as physical.  Have you attended a talk at your club, gym or spa? You’re a trendsetter!

Besides the fad that may become a trend of me trying to hold my abs engaged, you get five more fitness trends for 2016:

Five to Thrive

  1. Demand for educated, experienced, certified fitness professionals. (While I was surprised to see this as a trend, I suuuuuure do welcome it. Women over 50 are smart enough to demand qualified pros, not to be seduced by celebrities and social media darlings whose main qualifications are lots of followers on pinterest and revealing photos on instagram. No, I’m not covetous of those ripped abs. Well, not enough to actually do much about it. I’m busy. …….. Busy relaxing and researching trends).
  2. Healthy food choices as a renewed focus, especially looking at eating habits that enhance our brains, are more resource conscious, and serve social values. Contrast this to the past 50 years of making eating decisions based on convenience and/ or weight loss.
  3. kayaking on Whiskeytown LakeOutdoor activity. Do you see where this dovetails with the travel plans boomers have?
  4. Brain boosting movement. As we watch our parents suffer from memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia, a whole heckuvalot of us baby boomers are saying “nuh uh” to that. Given the advances in medical technology (MRIs, brain scans) and neuroplasticity, we can now train the brain while bolstering the body. Who doesn’t love a twofer?
  5. Spa visits. This trend was another surprise for me given the recent recession. Apparently we are spending billions on destination resorts, day spas, walk in treatments, wellness retreats and the like. Much as personal training shifted from a luxury for the wealthy to a mainstream “need” for the middle class, spa treatments are undergoing a similar reappraisal. Again, baby boomers are leading the way as we redefine body work as a health and wellness enhancer, not just a pampered relaxation moment.
2 of these top 10 fitness trends surprised us. Click To Tweet
Fitness trends presentation for WAC

What my talk for WAC covers: Yak, yak, yak, hope they ask me back!

If you did your brain boosting exercises, which you monitored on your wearable technology outdoors at a resort after a healthy meal, then you’d see that the above 5 + 5 trends get us to the promised 10. Ta dum! Over and out — to move and look for more trends.

If you wonder which prior years’ trend predictions came true or fizzled, go here: Want to Know Top Insider Fitness Trends and Quotes?

and here: 5 Healthy Food Trends

and also here: Exercise Trends for the Over 50 Crowd

Heck, why not be the most informed trendtracker EVAH and also go here: I’m Spa-tacus and Other Spa Industry Trends

ACTION: Subscribe to get more, be more, live more. Need we say more? Enter your email and name in any of the boxes.

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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Holman Ranch in Carmel Valley and Highway 1

Last month I was part of a group that got to visit Holman Ranch in Carmel Valley in California. Located at the northern end of the Pacific Coast Highway Scenic Drive, and just 12 miles inland, it’s a combination of rolling hills and vineyards, estate wines, wedding-perfect landscaping, and architectural history.

statue at Holman Ranch, Carmel ValleyHistory
Back when California was still part of Mexico, the ranch lands were bestowed to the Mission San Carlos Borromeo del Rio Carmel. By 1928 it had changed hands several times, and a hacienda was constructed. Nicknamed “Hidden House,” it was a hideaway for Hollywood celebrities. You can see many pictures of them on the walls of the still-standing building.
In the 1940’s it was expanded to include guest rooms and one of the first swimming pools in Carmel Valley. Fast forward to 2006, and the current owners brought it back to its original splendor, while adding vineyards, olive groves and wine caves.

wine cave, Holman RanchWine and Food
On our tour we got to taste a number of their estate wines, which have been rightly listed by National Geographic as one of the “world’s 10 best wines.” What appealed to me was their organic, high end Jarman varietals because they were created to honor co-owner Hunter Lowder’s mother, with a portion of proceeds going to the Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation.

Listed by Nat'l Geographic as having 1 of the “world’s 10 best wines,” Holman Ranch has that… Click To Tweet

wine barrel, Holman RanchMy dad, a former wine connoisseur, would love their estate wine club. Besides getting exclusive access to some of their limited-production wines (which I found out means you cannot buy them elsewhere), club membership is also one of the ways to gain access to the ranch grounds, events and guest cottages. My dad also would have loved the offsite Will’s Fargo restaurant (which is owned by the same family) where we got to have dinner as their special guests. I had a favorite waiter. He noticed I was a bit cold on the outdoor patio and brought me a folded up tablecloth to put around my shoulders. I think he liked me best!

guest cottage, Holman RanchThe Buildings
Even if you care nothing for wine, you’ll still want to stay on the property. Weddings, retreats, special events, (we were a group of 14 bloggers, though the property can accommodate 38 overnight guests), or corporate dinners are all options for staying overnight in one of the 10 “cabins.” I have it in quotation marks because my so-called cabin had a kitchen, living room, and two separate bedrooms, each with their own bathroom. It was divine, actually.

tall poppies at Holman RanchAfter touring the wine caves, we got a thorough tour of the – are you ready for this – game room, carriage house, great room, conference room, chapel, lawn and veranda, garden courtyard, rose patio, and stone terrace. We were also given complete access to the swimming pool.

bespoke cushion at Holman RanchWe had spent the previous night in Carmel-by-the-Sea, which was a few miles away, yet completely different. I was trying to decide which place I preferred, and came to the conclusion that they were tied for first because both places were amazing in their own right. The main thing they had in common was superior hospitality.

bay at Point LobosHighway 1
If you want scenery, take Highway 1 along the California coast instead of the inland freeway choices. After leaving Holman Ranch, I wasn’t in a hurry to get home, so I took this route for the first time in quite a few years. Even though it was foggy for much of the drive, I managed to get some great photos, and go on a few hikes. One warning – your nose will let you know when you’re at the elephant seal rookery just north of Hearst Castle.

lighthouse on PCH

Bixby Bridge, Highway 1

Pfeiffer State Park

Tunnel on Highway 1

elephant seals, Cambria

Text and photos: Alexandra Williams, MA

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Redding: Kayaking, SUP Yoga, Hiking, Aqua Golf & Lorikeets

Does kayaking on a lake with a park ranger sound enjoyable? Or hitting golf balls into a river? How about practicing yoga on a stand up paddle (SUP) board in a quiet bay, or hiking to the top of a waterfall? Perhaps you’d prefer to stay still and become a landing pad for butterflies and lorikeets.

Crystal Creek FallsThese are the activities we had planned for our final two days in Redding last month. To learn about our adventures for the first two days, please read our recent post about Redding.

Whiskey Creek Lake
SUP yogaWhen we woke up Sunday morning, the sky was drizzly, but not too bad, so the SUP yoga class with Audrey was still on. Swimsuits on and towels packed in the car, we drove out to Whiskey Creek Boat Launch to find a few hardy souls ready to brave what had now become a very strong, cold rain. A quick vote was taken and it was decided to cancel class, a rare occurrence. We hope you’ll give it a try when you go to Redding, and say hi to Audrey.

Of course, as soon as we drove away, the weather turned sunny. Isn’t that how it always works? So we gathered up our good attitudes and hiked to the top of Crystal Creek Waterfall. By the time we came back down to the main pool, kids were swimming in it, and splashing under the falls. We imagine it’s a perfect spot to cool off when it gets over 100 degrees in the summer. On the way back to town we stopped at the Tower House Historic District to check out the former hotel, gold mine and cemetery.

Tower House Barn, Redding

Aqua Golf
Aqua Golf, ReddingIn the afternoon, we went to the Aqua Golf Driving Range, where you get to hit golf balls into the Sacramento River. Or, in our case, in the general direction of the river. The area is enclosed by a net, and the golf balls float, so it’s a recyling-friendly event.
We laughed so hard, and had a really fun time. We also discovered (my 19-year-old beat the pants off us) that being athletic has no relationship to golf swing skill. Face it, we were awful. Even the geese were impertinently walking right in front of us, daring us to hit a ball near them.

Turtle Bay and Sundial Bridge
Turtle Bay lorikeetsMost people who have heard of Redding know about Turtle Bay and the Sundial Bridge, and for good reason. We were at Turtle Bay at the right time to see the lorikeets and butterflies start their day, before the crowds arrived. butterfly Turtle BayWe even saw ducklings drop from the sky onto the ground just in front of us. Or at least that’s what it seemed like. Later we learned from Ranger Jim (see below) that they were probably wood ducks dropping from their tree nest. Wood ducklings, Turtle BayWant to know a secret about the Sundial Bridge? If you go during nesting time (we were there in May), look down through the glass partitions where the bridge supports attach to try and spot the swallow nests. We saw all kinds of nest-building going on, with the sparrows going in and out with their building materials. Super cool.

Sundial Bridge, Redding

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial, and Redding is the perfect base for… Click To Tweet

Kayaking
kayaking on Whiskeytown LakeWhiskeytown Lake has 36 miles of shoreline and 3,200 surface acres for recreation, and I think we had that entire space to ourselves. Park Superintendent Jim Milestone was our private guide, and he even spotted a bald eagle with two chicks waaaaaaay up in a tree. (Note to self: Get a really good zoom lens for future kayaking adventures). bald eage with chicks, Whiskeytown LakeThe kayaking (they also have SUP) is free, though they do have a donation box, so be a good citizen and put in a few Tubmans.  Besides showing us the lake’s treasures, Ranger Jim also shared stories about the history of the lake and President Kennedy’s visit in 1963.

The National Parks Service is celebrating its centennial this year, so we encourage you to hie thee hence to the area, using Redding as your base. And if you spot Ranger Jim (or bald eagle chicks), you’ll know it’s your lucky day.Ranger Jim, Whiskeytown Lake

by Alexandra Williams, MA

photo credits: Alexandra

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