Archive

Category Archives for "I Want to Feel Better"
28

Your Medical Condition Pisses Me Off

Your Medical Condition Pisses Me Off

A family member had a thalamic stroke in September, then a TIA (transient ischemic attack) in March, followed by a combination atrial fibrillation and cerebellum stroke in April. These exciting events changed a person who was active, busy, smart and fairly easygoing into someone who has serious memory issues, cannot walk, cannot swallow (which means a stomach tube), is cranky a lot, and will require 24-hour supervision for a long while upon release from the rehab hospital. Are you envious yet?

I write this, not to feel sorry for myself, because I’m actually not, but to share some of the things I wish someone had told me about the non-medical implications of stroke. I would have been better prepared mentally if I’d known more than just the medical checklist. Maybe my experiences will help you if you’re ever in a similar position.

photo of a hairpin turn on a mountain road

Life Can Take Sharp, Unexpected Turns

You’ll Get Angry
At first, I was told the September stroke was due to obesity and plaque that broke off into the bloodstream. In other words, lifestyle. I discovered it’s entirely possible to simultaneously care about someone and be super pissed off. How dare he not bother to take care of himself, then put me in a position of having to take care of him? Why should I be a caretaker of someone who didn’t bother?
It now appears that the strokes were also related to an underlying heart issue, which helps me forgive, yet I still want to acknowledge that it’s probable (and permissible) that you’ll be pissed off. I haven’t taken it out on anyone, nor will I, yet I would have appreciated it if someone else in this sudden and unexpected role would have told to me plan on being angry. Be angry without guilt. But also be careful who you share your anger with. Not the patient, obviously. Not your children. And not any family members who will try to talk you out of your feelings or imply you’re a bad person. Friends who understand that it’s possible to be pissed, scared, loyal and responsible all at once are the best.

mountain brook

Let It Flow – the Anger, Guilt and Tears

You’ll Get Sad
Not just for all your loved one has lost, but for your losses too. There is a long, freaking list of losses – sleep, free time, vacations, the ability to come and go at will, companionship, future plans, income, hobbies, predictability, expectations, appreciation, ability to focus on kids and their events, help maintaining the household, illusions, independence, identity, and a lot more but my memory is shot from dealing with everything.
In addition to being sad for the person who’s had the stroke (or heart attack, etc.), you’ll feel sad for your kids too. Even with older kids, the illusion that their parent (or uncle/ aunt/ sibling) will always be around comes to a screeching halt. What do we want more than anything for our kids? To protect them and watch them lead happy lives. I’m sad I cannot protect them. I’m sad they’re unhappy and grieving and helpless. We tell our kids that we’ll always be there for them, and that lie keeps our illusions and theirs going. I told my 21-year-old, “I may be overwhelmed and tired, but I’m still your mom. I’m still here for you. I still have time for you. I have other things I can give up, as you are my priority.” And it made me sad that I had to say that, as our kids should be able to take our “momness” for granted.

You’ll Feel Guilty
No matter what you do, you’ll feel you haven’t done enough, spent enough time, been patient enough, researched enough, updated concerned family and friends quickly enough, written thank you letters to people who brought meals or gave rides– even taking time to sleep or relax will seem like “cheating.” Part of your brain will recognize that it’s impossible to do everything, but that other little nagging part will work on your guilt complex like a dachshund with a squeaky toy.
But you know what?! Let it go, and not in a “Frozen” way. Yes, you are standing while another is suffering, but there’s no rule of physics that says only one person can suffer at a time. You have also lost a lot, and it’s not disloyal or selfish to take time off for fun, or to sleep in, or accept help. Bottom line – if you aren’t taking care of yourself, you’re incapable of taking care of another. Besides, that would put you in a never-ending loop, as I just mentioned above that it’s normal to feel angry about someone else not taking good self-care. If you’re too exhausted to function well, someone else will have to step in and rescue you. I doubt you want that.

The martyr thing is a dead-end, and renders you useless. Yes, of course you will do everything you can, and it’s a given that you will provide compassionate care and handle the extra load. We all know someone who has been or is a caretaker, and we all admire them for their selflessness, right?! Speaking only for myself, I know I’m not selfless or selfish; I’m just a responsible person who tries to do the right thing.
And I think part of doing the right thing is saying that you are not alone if you end up angry, sad and guilt-ridden. It’s just part of the deal.

by Alexandra Williams, MA

4

How to Handle Weight Gain When You Suffer Loss

How to Handle Weight Gain When You Suffer Loss

White flowerWhite flowerWhite flowerDear Alexandra and Kymberly: I just lost my husband, Julian to cancer. Due to all the hospital appointments, my eating habits also got lost! I have put on a lot of weight, but feel so tired and lethargic I can’t get into the mood to do exercise. I have damage to my neck, knees, and lower back (due to a fall) plus my midriff and waist have become “large” and I have lost my waistline. At 69 years young this is depressing me. I am also worried about a “ledge” at the bottom of my tummy and scared it will be “resting” on the top of my legs when I sit down!!!

As well, I look after my 96 year young Mum, who has no balance anymore due to cancer and other problems. So she is only able very slowly to get from one room to another downstairs. I get to bed about 1:30am once my Mum’s medication kicks in and she falls asleep. She usually wakes me about 7am to go to the toilet, then goes back to bed until 10:00. (She is in a hospital bed in my living room so isn’t able to get up by herself). I have been looking after my Mum for 3 years and my husband for the last 2 and half, so have had little sleep etc. which may be the reason I feel tired. Since Julian died, I am still running around for Mum, but not doing the right things to lose the “middle” weight.

I need all the help I can get!! I appreciate other people’s input so have included my name. Kindest regards, Patricia of Cambridgeshire, United Kingdom

Dear Patricia: Wow! Talk about the perfect storm for changes to your body, mood, and energy levels! We’re amazed and honored you have time to write to us for advice. Fortunately, we have some practical suggestions that may help you and other widows, post menopausal women, and caregivers gain energy and lose weight. (Check out what we told caregivers who wrote to us with similar concerns: A Workout Plan to Lose Weight When You Are a Caregiver)Exercisers vs non-Exerciserspicmonkey_image Exercisers vs non-Exercisers

First, Deal with Your Diet

  1. Get back to your (implied) healthier eating habits asap. To reduce pounds you have to focus more on calories in (food and drink) than out (exercise and movement). (Yes, we know the UK measures in pounds, just like we crazy North Americans across the pond). While exercise will help keep any lost pounds off, diet is what will jump start your weight loss in the first place.
  2. Try to eat at home as much as possible using ingredients instead of processed food that comes in packages.
  3. Start your day with breakfast, maybe right after you help your mom back to bed. Not knowing more about your eating habits makes it tough to give specific advice, but the above changes will start to whittle that waistline towards the worry-free zone.

Starlights at RanchStarlights at RanchStarlights at RanchStarlights at RanchStarlights at RanchSecond, Sleep More

  1. Find time to get more sleep. Whether you nap or adjust your nighttime sleeping schedule, you need to snooze between 7-8 hours per night in order to avoid more weight gain and to help drop what you’ve already put on. Doesn’t that seem counterintuitive AND too good to be true? In general, people who get fewer than 6 hours’ daily sleep tend to eat more as they are awake more. And hormones that regulate appetite are thrown into disarray with the sleep-deprived. Take a look at our post, 3 Stealth Saboteurs of Your Weight Loss to help you prioritize guilt-free naps or going back to bed briefly after breakfast. (That’s a lot of Bs in a row, right?)Meditating woman - artwork
  2. According to research from the University of Michigan, an extra hour of sleep each night can help you drop 14 pounds per year. Reading our past posts on the subject of sleep and stress (such as Do This if You Want to Get Fit, Lose Weight, Live Longer, and Destress) should not put you to sleep, however.
  3. If you cannot nap or extend your nighttime restoration hours, engage in short, daily bouts of mindfulness, meditation, or guided visualization. If you enter “Meditation” in our search bar you will find several posts on ways and whys to get started.

Third, Move to Manage Your Middle

  1. Doing a side plank on the Ranch bridgeFinally we get to our favorite part–Movement!! When you are sitting with your Mom/Mum, don’t sit! Stand, walk in place, go down the stairs then back up then back down then back up whenever you check on her. This last suggestion will take only an extra few minutes, especially if you add some speed to this action. Then you will also get some High Intensity Interval Training benefits (mentioned in Best Workouts to Burn Fat for Women Over 50).
  2. 20140825_134356Doing a side plank on the Ranch bridgeDoing a side plank on the Ranch bridgeKnowing how hard it is to get moving when tired, can you work in some strength training exercise early in the day? Early morning exercisers tend to be more consistent and successful with reaching their goals. Maybe some mornings you snatch a few more minutes of sleep after helping your mom go the bathroom; other mornings you do some lunges, push-ups, squats, and side- or knee-planks (easier on your back) before the day zaps your energy. Once you start moving more you will actually find your energy levels going up.
  3. If you watch tv with your mom, use the commercials as time to move. Walk in place; press yourself from from your chair, standing then sitting a few times; lie down and whip out a few ab exercises. If you know you are committing to just a few minutes during the ads you may be more able to find the energy to get restarted.
  4. When you are feeling particularly fatigued, ask yourself what the LEAST activity you could muster up is. Even a little bit of movement will propel you towards success. And a little success begets a little more success.
  5. As well, take a look at past posts of ours that offer solutions to the fat attracting combo of stress, eating habits gone awry, loss, insufficient sleep, and minimal movement.

If you have a weensy bit more time and energy, then click over go to our YouTube Channel where you can find exercises just right for your goals and capabilities.

Let us know how you fare and feel free to comment below, especially once others share their tips and support. We offer our condolences on your husband’s death.

TransformAging posterANNOUNCEMENTS: For more on restarting your fitness program, keep your eyes, ears, and mind open for our upcoming webinar, TransformAging. Coming in late May, handpicked experts in midlife wellness for women will offer practical solutions and the most relevant answers to popular questions on how to age better than any prior generation! Hosted by us at no cost to you!

Doing a side plank on the Ranch bridgeTransformAging 1

Webinar attendees will also be the first to get the details on our first ever, brand new, fit-tastic workout program specifically designed for women over 50 who want to (re)start active lives.

13

What Do Exercisers Know That Non-Exercisers Don’t?

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

7 Secrets Exercisers Use to Motivate Themselves

Kymberly at Ranch in treeNashville bowling- AlexandraYou SAY you want to be more fit and active. You really MEAN to work out more. But somehow the days, weeks, months, dare we say “years” slip by and there you are — still intending to finally be more active but not actually doing much about it. Forget guilt, self-beratement, and worrying about having excuses that last longer than your most recent resolution.

What it is that regular exercisers have figured out that keeps them on track? More to the point, what can you learn from those ratfinks enlightened, fortunate individuals that will get you up and moving?

  1. Regular, committed exercisers have figured out the “why” behind their activity and linked it to their values. They don’t work out just to work out; they have a bigger purpose or goal driving them.
  2. Fit people have made movement a habit so they no longer need to exert extreme willpower in order to stay “on track.”
  3. Many (though certainly not all) movers and shakers do activities they enjoy.
  4. Exercisers know how they will feel after their activity and are able to remind themselves of the joy and satisfaction they’ll feel post workout.Alexandra on trail
  5. Active agers have found ways to account for excuses, such as not having enough time, being uncomfortable, or feeling too tired. Their movement experience confirms that they’ll have more energy, feel less fatigued, feel happier in their bodies, and prioritize workout time BECAUSE they exercise.
  6. Lifelong exercisers have tuned in and turned on to —— and this is a biggie! —— the benefits exercise brings beyond visual results. Sure, they also want to look great. But they get hooked on the internal, non-visible rewards of an active life. Because those benefits are so pervasive, exercisers are consistently being rewarded even when not in front of a mirror or on a scale.
  7. Active people surround themselves with others who are active. They seek out people who share their commitment to movement, even if it means tuning out inactive family members, coworkers, and “friends” who might sabotage their efforts.

(Like the chart I made? Please feel free to pin the heck out of it.)

what exercisers know image

Bonus Story and Quick Quiz Question about taking a magic fitness pill:

If you could take a magic pill (yes, one that tastes good, has no side effect, costs nothing, and is small) that instantly gave you the body measurements you want for the rest of your life, would you swallow it if it meant never being able to exercise again?

Behold the mighty Nashville statueEnter your comments below. Then read how this breaks down for others.

Non-exercisers grab for the gusto with a hearty “heck yeah, I’d swig that pill down! And what do you mean when you say ‘able to exercise?’ Don’t you mean ‘HAVE to exercise’?”

Exercisers break into two camps: most say “hmmm, tough choice, but ultimately I’d pass as the other benefits of exercise outweigh simply looking good. No magic pill for me, gracias”

The second camp of exercisers tries to negotiate: “any chance I could take that magic pill AND still work out regularly? Then I’d get the best of all options.”

Did you see that coming? Speaking of which, if you want to keep our active aging answers coming, be sure to subscribe. Now is a good time. Do it. Do it.

26

A Walk is as Good as a Run

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

More Mesa walk

Do Walk Away! And walk this way.

Are you a runner whose impact days are numbered? Or a walker who wonders whether you need to pick up the pace but really don’t want to?

Happy news for you non-joggers, former runners, and wanna be walkers who want a strong heart without the joint stress. Brisk walking may be as good for your heart health as a run.

Certainly walking isn’t as intense as running. However, both activities target similar muscle groups, which may be why results in improving heart health are so similar. Research suggests that the type of exercise may not be as important as how much you go, go go. So move forward; locomote; get your gait on!

Heart Smart Fun Fit Facts

Walking for at least 30 minutes a day can help you:

  • Maintain body weight and lower the risk of obesity.
  • Enhance mental well being. Think back to walks you’ve taken. Ever start out stressed and come home happy? Mood moment!
    Kila and Liberty on rock

    Walk? Run? We don’t care. Just take us out. Makes our dog hearts happy.

  • Reduce the risk of breast and colon cancer. May not sound sexy, but avoiding disease is pretty important as we age, right?
  • Reduce the risk of coronary heart disease. See above. Combine it with the fact that women are at greater risk than men for heart disease and we might as well open that front door and get going.
  • Reduce the risk of osteoporosis. I want young personage bones and am willing to walk for them. And you?
  • Improve blood pressure and blood sugar levels.
  • Improve blood lipid profile. Make your doctor happy.
  • Reduce the risk of non-insulin dependent (type 2) diabetes. Have you heard that this is one of the fastest growing diseases in the US? Don’t contribute to this stat.

Want some easy, practical walking tips to get you started or rev you up more? Watch our short video on Walking for Weight Loss (and More). Then bust a move to our post Great Gait: 7 Steps to Better Walking to really get the most out of your walks.

Walk For Weight Loss (video)

Take a City Walking Tour

Why is my Lower Body in Pain?

The “Best” Pedometer

More Life and Pep in Your Step

Beach view for Kila and LibertyAnother Fun Fit Fact about walking is that for every hour you perambulate (just had to use that jaunty word), your life expectancy may increase by two hours.  Not only that, but a faster stride may also be a predictor of a longer life. (Convinced yet? Read our post Can Walking Really Get You to Your Fit Destination?)

Standing during Ranch walk break

Done with Run; Talk about Walk!

Of all the cardio exercise options out there, walking has the lowest dropout rate! It’s the easiest, most accessible, positive change you can make to improve your heart health. And the benefits are exponential. The more you walk, the greater your odds of lowering heart disease risk. What are you walking for?

Would you like fab posts like this one to magically arrive in your inbox twice a week? Subscribe in that nice little box on the right side of this post, and you’ll even receive a free copy of “Look 5 Pounds Thinner in 5 Minutes.” 

14

Exercises That Are Joint-Friendly for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Alexandra Williams, MA

pool classes are great on jointsDear Fun and Fit: Hi, ladies! I used to work out all of the time and then I was diagnosed with Felty’s Syndrome (a rare form of Rheumatoid Arthritis – RA) and I gave up for a long time. Between that and some other things going on in my life I haven’t worked out in 5 years! I’m over it and want to get back into it, but I am lost when it comes to finding something that I can actually do. I know I have to start all over again, but I need something that will not do more damage to my bones. My knees, shoulders, hands and feet are where I have the most problem. That and getting to a gym. Do you have some ideas of ways I can work out around the house, get in shape and get back to the old me before the old me is too old?
Rena

Hey Rena. My first inclination was to recommend aqua workouts, which are perfect for achy joints, but I already know that you don’t have a pool, so we’ll have to think of other options. Read the linked post anyway, as it also mentions other options that reduce joint stress, such as the elliptical trainer, Pilates and resistance training. As you cannot get to a gym (or beach), I’ll focus on in-home suggestions.

Felty’s Syndrome
For those unfamiliar with RA and Felty’s, classic symptoms include painful, stiff, swollen joints, most commonly the hands, arms and feet. White blood cell counts are very low, and fatigue is common, as is anemia (low red blood cell count).

Before giving suggestions for dealing with exercise and arthritis, I have a few questions.
* Has your doctor cleared you to work out, even at a minimal level
* What kind of range of motion do you have around your affected joints
* Do you have any equipment at home, such as tubes with handles, a recumbent bike, a mat, stability ball
* Is there a certain time of day, such as morning, when you are more comfortable
* Have you consulted with a nutrition expert to see which foods you might want to decrease or increase

Screen Shot 2015-03-22 at 1.17.42 PMSeated Elliptical Machine
Generally speaking, people with painful joints do well with equipment such as a seated elliptical machine (you can even get ones with gloves, in case your hands can’t grip well). Of course, these might be cost-prohibitive for you, so I’ll give you other options too.

Resistance Tubes
If you have enough grip strength to hold a tube handle, you can do a lot of resistance exercises with a tube. The yellow one provides the least resistance, so is the best place to start. The different colors indicate different levels of resistance, so choose accordingly. A colleague wrote a post for us a few years ago about exercising with tubes, which you might want to read.
I’ll also link you to two tube videos I did when I was recovering from foot surgery that might be helpful (and before I knew to turn my iPhone sideways when filming):
Seated Mid-Back Exercise
Chest Exercise yellow resistance tube

Seated on the Ball or Mat
As you don’t mention hip joint pain, maybe you can try some seated exercises. Our video post Seated Abs Exercise: Obliques Circle will help your core strength and possibly get you to work up a sweat too.

These are just a few of the many directions you can head as you look for comfortable exercises. And because I trust our own advice, I’ll encourage you to wander through our YouTube exercise videos (we have over 100), as they are designed for women our age, though not for any specific diagnosis, so choose the ones that resonate with you.

In the long run, I hope you can get to a pool. When I taught at the Rochester Athletic Club in Minnesota, they had an Aqua Joints program that was certified by the Arthritis Foundation Aquatic Program (AFAP). It was non-impact exercises in a warm water pool that helped improve range of motion, increase strength, and challenge endurance with low-level cardio conditioning. Maybe the AFAP has a similar class near you.

The true answer to your question is “It depends.” But these exercises should get you started in the right direction. One last post you might like to check out is “Six Practical Fitness Tips for Older Adults,” which shares some ways to modify for your specific needs.

15

Are These Boomer-Friendly Fitness Trends in Your Future?

Alexandra Williams, MA and Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

IHRSA TRX booth

Hanging out at IHRSA 2015

Wonder which fitness products, trends, and exercises lie in your future active life? Then shoulder-shove your way down trade show aisles with us to catch highlights from the recent 2015 IHRSA Convention and Trade show (association for fitness club owners/ managers). Our mission? To ferret out and focus on the equipment and workouts suited for Boomers (or anyone who wants to age actively, yet has joint aches and pains and limitations, oh my). Yup, we’re both fitness trendsetters and trendspotters.

Alexandra: But first, a shout-out to ourselves, as it turns out we were both in the Top Ten for most socially engaged people at the convention.

We were beat out by keynote speaker Arianna Huffington, a popular conference speaker, and Dai Manuel (a fellow FitFluential ambassador). Maybe it’s time to raise our rates. Hmmmm.

20150311_175131

I’m sitting in the 4th Row Center where Arianna could see me and be inspired

Kymberly: Arianna can take first place as most influential online IHRSA “attendee” with no envy from me as she was so clever in her keynote. I almost thought Alexandra wrote her material, that’s how funny Mz Huff was. Please note that a certain Me was ranked higher than a certain Not Me twinster. Score!

Wearable Technology is IT (Get it?)

As for a key trend coming your way bigger than our hair and shoulder pads in the 80s — wearable technology is IT! Bands, apps, bracelets, watches, cords, equipment screens, club check-in software, online community connections, and more are infiltrating, permeating, hyperventilating our fitness future. Proof is coming in that tracking and measuring devices actually work! People who use technology are moving more.

Kila wearing the Skulpt AIm

No

Skulpt Aim measuring Kymberly's quad

Yes

We saw all kinds of amazing gadgets that gather your workout data, health profile, preferences, fat levels–you name it– in order to help you succeed with your health and fitness goals. Need accountability? Motivation? Feedback? Workout buddies? An exercise program to go? if you can conceive of it, you will find it at the IHRSA trade show which was loaded with ingenuity and visionary high techy thingies. Hey, I am currently testing out a handheld device that measures my body fat and muscle quality, courtesy of Skulpt Aim. I simply hold up to certain muscles the Skulpt Aim, which looks like a smart phone and voila — personalized data that I wish would lie to me. But it doesn’t.

You probably are contributing to the health and fitness tech trend right now. Have you ever used a pedometer? (Read our post on assessing pedometers) Slapped on a heart rate monitor? Synced a workout tracking device to your phone? Input info into a cardio machine that goes to a personal profile? Plead guilty to being a trend driver.

So you’re all fitted up with monitoring devices, but which workouts offer options for midlifers who may suffer from joint issues?

 

TRX Training for Midlifers
Alexandra: We have taken a few of the TRX suspension training classes before, but we wanted to know if they had a workout that would be suited for those of us with bad knees (Kymberly’s recent surgery), bad wrists (Alexandra’s recent fall), or other issues that make it necessary to modify so many other workout regimens.

pic of TRX training at IHRSA

Getting great instruction at the TRX booth

So many of our students have asked our opinion about suspension training, worried they might fall or embarrass themselves if they tried it, so we went straight to the top to find answers. By “top” we mean we had our very own personalized workout with Dan Mcdonogh, the TRX Training and Development Manager and 2012 IDEA (our professional association) Fitness Instructor of the Year.

With a focus on good form (we loved him for that), Dan took us through a myriad of options for some of the main moves: squats, lunges, planks, rows, push-ups. Every time we said, “that would be an issue for someone with knee problems,” or “how can I do this move if I’m worried about balance,” Dan had a solution. (Keep an eye out for our video of this workout coming soonish to our website. See Dan survive standing between us as we crack jokes and compliment his red hair).

End Result: We totally loved this workout, as it helped increase our strength, balance, core and flexibility, all of which are important for Boomers (well, anyone really). I will just mention that I was amazing. Kymberly might have been too, but I kept poking her in the surgery leg.

TRX with Dan O'Donough and Fraser Quelch

Two of the world’s top TRX trainers – Dan Mcdonogh and Fraser Quelch. We are Superstahhhs.

Kymberly: Poke, poke, no joke. I really kneed to find exercise options that offer intensity with minimal joint impact. After doing a pain free happy dance for TRX, I found my cardio nirvana on the Total Wave Fitness.

More than two months of no cardio (aside from mosey level dog walks) has left me desperate to get my sweat on. Where, oh where is a high intensity, low impact exercise mode right for knees in rehab? That is fun? With variety? And smooth comfort like a Tom Jones song? Oh my gosh, but gliding on the Wave machine is perfect for anyone who wants an aerobic heart rate with no bone pounding. If you want to go for a ride and slide from side to side, talk your club into getting one of these. Sore feet? Wonky knees? Try the Total Wave. No excuses or downtime for joint pain sufferers. Santa Barbara Spectrum are you listening? Buy this for me — and the other members too, of course.

This crazy looking contraption could be the answer to those of you for whom aches and pains keep you from taking cardio classes or getting on cardio equipment. If you send me one, I WILL find room for it in my house.

Here’s to finding ways to work out as we age.
Readers: How has an injury or chronic condition kept you from exercising? What solution(s) did you find? And … is your klout score higher than ours? Comment below. And subscribe if you have not already.

 

12

How To Start an Exercise Program: Do the Least Possible

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA and Alexandra Williams, MA

View from More Mesa

Get started with a walk — not of 5000 miles

Dear K and A: I need to just begin something–anything–physical. Writing for a living and being hyper focused on survival has changed my body in ways I don’t like. Never an athlete, exercise doesn’t come naturally to me. Starting is just the hardest thing. And beachbody goals don’t work for me. I just want to be well, and I know activity is an important component of that. But the first step feels insurmountable. Help! Kim Jorgensen Gane (You can use my name and people can check me out at GANEPossible.com

Alexandra: Ah, well, it’s super obvious that you are not exactly thrilled about the idea of exercise, judging by your word choices.  You say you “need,” not “want,” to begin a program. Do you know that Rolling Stones song?

When I was in grad school we were taught that we have to start from where the client is. In other words, we are NOT going to assign you any specific exercises, because you are not likely to do them.

I actually believe the best place for you to start is with your concept of Exercise. Methinks (maybe that word comes from my BA in Medieval History; maybe I just like the word) you need a new word and concept. So let’s just say Movement is what you need, as a solution and concept. And a decrease in your stress.

Toast to Alexandra and wine

Whining – One of Alexandra’s enjoyable activities

Some questions to ask yourself, with some examples to get you started:

  1. What movement do I enjoy? Dancing, walking, Hula Hoop twirling, swimming… ???
  2. What good things will happen to me when (not if) I move more? Energy, weight loss, more cheerfulness, new clothes, better health, lower stress levels… ???
  3. What is the very least I can do today? Five minutes around the block, 4 wall push-ups, 3 trips back and forth to the mailbox… ???
  4. How will I know when I’ve achieved my goal?
Plank push up combo from Kymberly

Anyone can manage a plank or push-up combo aka Plush-Up, right?

Kymberly: Let me interject here with non-counseling, fitness pro suggestions based on experience. Methinks you should start small and quickly taper off. Just kidding, In part. Do start with a little step in the movement direction. Maybe do one or two exercises during a tv commercial.  Get up and down from your chair 10 times. That’s a squat series. Plop down on the floor and whip out some reverse curls or a plank and a few push-ups for just 60 seconds. Take a walk around the block after a morning of computer time. Think of it as your reward for working so long and hard at writing.

However, don’t start with an exercise program or full routine. Staring at a big, long term, ongoing commitment may be too overwhelming. Start today with something lasting fewer than 5 minutes as that will be more enticing and achievable.

Build more movement into your day instead of considering exercise something separate from, or added to your schedule. Once you have the habit of moving consistently, you will more easily transition from the “getting started” phase to the “active living every day” phase. This latter phase would transition to an exercise program you’ll be ready for. Eagerly. With Enthusiasm. Or at least with Enduring Habit.

Alexandra: Without overwhelming you (and tacitly giving you permission to sit in your chair reading instead of moving), I’m going to link to a few of our previous posts to help you answer the four questions I posed above.

As soon as you’re done reading this post, close your eyes and recall a time you had fun moving. How did you feel–in your body, in your emotions, in your energy, in your sense of enjoyment? Focus on those feelings as you choose movement you will enjoy. Once you’ve gotten yourself more in the habit of moving in an enjoyable way, even for 5 minutes, you can start to add strength training or longer duration cardio. The good news? After you’ve gotten into the movement habit, and associated it with those good feelings from above, you will Want to move. Then you can add Exercise to your routine.

Kymberly: Like my sis, I found a few more posts to help you get started. Guilt-free! Read them AFTER getting up from your computer. Or at least march in place while reading them.

And with your name, who could resist the saying: No Pain, All Gane, It’s Kim Possible!

Reader Action Item: Want to move? Not want to move, but know you will be better for it? Subscribe to our site to get active aging advice twice a week. Go to the right hand column, scroll up, enter your email, join the elite who get the BEST fitness advice for baby boomer women.

 

18

How Do You Pick the Best Workout Shoe?

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA and Alexandra Williams, MA

Walking at the Ranch in TherafitsWe get asked often which are the BEST shoes for working out, walking, taking fitness classes, going to and from the gym, or for feet that are in pain.

In fact, we just got asked that again in this radio interview with nationally known fitness pro, Debra Atkinson. Better Sex, Arms, and Knees as You Age.  For sure go listen to the podcast. Not only will you find out how to put the best shoes on your feet, but also you will get some laughs.

Kymberly: When it comes to picking appropriate shoewear, I advocate wearing a pair specific to each activity. For instance, when I walk on paved or smooth paths, I choose Therafit walking shoes. When tackling hikes or trails with uneven terrain, I prefer my trail shoes. And for teaching my indoor fitness classes, I select shoes from yet a different company that makes indoor studio shoes solely for women.

Therafit, shoe tracing, Kymberly

Both Therafits fit!

Are You Ready to Get Picky?

I rarely wear my indoor fitness shoes outdoors as I want them to offer top performance as long as possible. I switch to a sandal, clog, or slip on shoe once I leave the gym. Your feet are your first line of defense so put your focus and funds into giving them activity-specific shoes.

Since Therafit sent us several pair of shoes to test out, we thought we’d share a few comments on their newest style, the Austin. (Consider this the official disclosure that we received free shoes). Given my knee injury and upcoming surgery, I am wearing comfort shoes more these days than usual. Ever since I was in my twenties, my family has teased me for always choosing “sensible shoes” over heels. This slip on clog definitely keeps my reputation intact for preferring cute, comfortable shoes over fancy, dress-up footwear. Because I can get the clog on and off without bending my knees much, they are coming with me to the surgical center. A girl has to mosey with style and a decent gait when walking off anesthesia you know! Or more to the point – I’ll be glad not to have to lace up anything at that point.clogs from Therafit

Want to Win Your Own Pair of Comfy Shoes?

One big tip if you decide to get your own pair of the Austin clogs or if you win the giveaway Therafit is offering one of our readers — order a half size up. You’ll want to be sure your heel sits inside, and not on the slight lip at the back of the shoe.

Alexandra: For picking exercise, we always say the best is the one you’ll do. For shoes, I say the best is the one that feels comfortable right away (needs no breaking in), and supports you in a way that helps protect your joints, muscles and ligaments.

Why Not Go Barefoot?

I know that the barefoot slippers had a lot of positive research a few years ago, but then it turned out that the major brands selling those shoes got sued (and lost) for false claims and research. So I continue to be in favor of actual shoes, especially for the university students I teach, as they have not had a strong history of movement, and their body awareness isn’t the same as it was for their parents’ generation. (I’ll save my opinion about the lack of budget support in elementary and secondary schools for P.E. for another post).

I wrote a long article about choosing fitness shoes for IDEA Fitness Journal a few years ago, and am hoping this link will get you to the article. Sometimes I’m able to get access without logging in (it’s a fitness professional membership site), so am hoping you can too.

picture of dog getting her belly scratched

The dog practically purrs when I scritchy-scratch her belly with my clogs on

As you can see by my picture, my blue Therafit Austin clogs are so comfy, even the dog feels happy. I’ve found they are perfect to wear to the gym, as I can switch to my cardio shoes quickly and easily.

Kymberly: We admit — it’s all about our dogs! And our doggies, aka toes! Other factors to take into account when choosing shoes for action and movement have to do with your foot patterns:

In Which Directions Will You Be Traveling?

Will you be going forward and backward, such as in an aerobic class (Step, Zumba, Low Impact, Dance, Cardio Kickboxing, for example). Or forward only such as when on a treadmill, elliptical machine or other cardio equipment.

If you are walking or running, then you will have more of a heel strike with a toe roll off. Contrast that to jogging in place, which has a toe, ball, heel landing. Choose a shoe that cushions and supports where your feel will be absorbing the most impact.

Do you count on your shoes to shift you side to side? Then find shoes that offer lateral support — the opposite of a running or walking shoe, for instance.

Will you be pivoting, twisting, and turning as you exercise? Then make sure the tread is designed to release grip so your shoe doesn’t grab ahold in one place, while your body rotates in a different direction. We call that “making your orthopedist rich.”

bottom of TherafitIn summation, just as you might buy street shoes to match a favorite outfit, select workout shoes that match the movement you’ll use them for. One size does not fit all.

But your size could fit our shoe giveaway. Enter our giveaway below and select any pair of Therafit shoes from their line of new arrivals. Check out the options here.
a Rafflecopter giveaway

The giveaway is only open to U.S. mailing addresses. When the giveaway ends, one winner will be picked and notified. That person has 48 hours to respond or another winner will be randomly drawn. 

10

3 No Cost Ways to Work Out Naturally

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

Have you subscribed yet? Do so now if you want to Age Actively.

Lake Tahoe in winterWant to live healthier, longer, and happier? At no cost? Then follow the advice from Annie Get Your Gun by “doin’ what comes naturally.” The following activities are all free – preservative free, fee-free, carefree! Look to nature and your body’s natural, internal pharmacy to get you across the fields of dreams. And take a look below at the short animoto video I created for you of healthy blue stuff. You’ll feel younger just watching it! If not, play the video backwards. Then go out, laugh, and breathe!

Get Out of Here, Ya Hear?

1.Annie Get Your Gun Exercise outside when you can. Getting outdoors to move enhances both your mental and physical health. If you doubt this, ask any dog who ever heard the word “walk time.”

Dogwalk with Kila at fence

Bark, Breathe, Pose, Run, Repeat (27 times)

A related Fun Fit Fact: People who live near or on coasts tend to be more physically active compared to inland dwellers.  Those fortunate to have ocean views (actually any blue water works), also report being happier than people without access to blue spaces. One theory is that gazing at the ocean triggers the brain to release dopamine, endorphins, and oxytocin. We post-menopausal women know all about hormones, especially the mood elevating ones, right?

Remember to Laugh; Laugh to Remember

Alexandra in catwoman glasses

She’s been making me laugh ever since I can remember. That Alexandra!

2. Add humor to your workout. Another great natural life source is laughter.  Not only does laughter act as self-produced medicine,  but also it is proving to help memory.  The stress hormone, cortisol can cause brain damage. Cortisol negatively affects both memory and learning ability, especially in older adults. This raises the question, “can laughter, which reduces stress, therefore improve memory?”

Turns out that, yup — lower stress leads to better memory. You saw that coming.

Breathe Right with the Left

At Tenaya with mask in soap class

Breathe, just not too deeply.

3. Take half breaths for a whole life. Really looking to keep your memory in high drive, and not idle as you age? Then try a special breathing technique just after your humor boost. When you forgot which aisle you parked your car in, or why you entered a room, kick into left nostril breathing. That’s right, just the left! Block or press shut your right nostril and inhale through the left. Exhale. Repeat. 27 times. Let’s hope this works as you have to remember to count as you breathe!

According to researchers, left nostril breathing creates a restful and alert state of mind that activates nerve endings of the parasympathetic system.  That is fancy talk for “reducing stress.”
20150117_135926

For you smarties and thinkers who are always a step ahead (and that would be all of you who subscribe to our blog), you probably already thought of something. What if you combine all three activities? Run, walk, jog, mosey outdoors with a person who makes you laugh as you count up 27 left nostril breaths. Then get back to us in the comments to report what happened. Join the nature movement; free membership!

And take a look at this very short animation.

Work Out Naturally

You got this far, so why not add a comment?

9

Poll results: What Motivates You to Work Out?

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

Leading balance move - Kymberly

Being Graceful or Just Aging with Energy?

Last month we posted two polls asking you to let us know your top fitness fears and motivators.  Wonder what the survey revealed? We certainly were curious to find out what gets you to exercise.  Click that link to access the full list of options.

Thanks and sweaty hugs to those who participated. You burned two calories just by clicking away. Of the roughly 135 entries recorded, the top vote getters of the surveys are below. The answers are listed with most popular leading off.

Poll Results 1: What Motivates You to Be Active? Top 5 ReasonsScreen Shot 2015-02-08 at 11.38.06 PM

  1. Have More Energy — this was heartening and surprising to see in the top spot. And it’s so true that exercise confers energy in abundance!
  2. Be Strong
  3. Age Gracefully*  What does this mean anyway? Look below as you’ll find some great definitions.
  4. Reduce Stress
  5. Minimize Risk of Illness or Disease

Screen Shot 2015-02-08 at 11.37.08 PMPoll Results 2: What Fears Do You Have Related to Your Body, Mind, and Aging? Top 6 Concerns

  1. Having to Stop or Reduce Activities I Now Enjoy
  2. Losing Independence
  3. Reducing Mental Faculties
  4. Losing Memory
  5. Dying Early From Illness or Disease
  6. Gaining Weight

What Does “Age Gracefully” Mean to You?

We confess that we offered the option “Age Gracefully” because so many midlife women identify with the phrase. As you’ll read in our post on getting older in a positive way, we don’t use this term too much ourselves.

But we really don’t know what aging gracefully means to you as it’s such a subjective phrase. So we asked online baby boomers to tell us their interpretation. (Yes, we did a highly subjective survey in Facebook. Worked for our purposes! We even got a few replies from men).

  • Midlife blogger, Joan Bickley Stommen defines aging gracefully as “continuing to be active and engaged, having a positive, upbeat attitude, and always having fun adventures to look forward to”  Is enjoying life no matter what and keeping your sense of awe and wonder one of your main reasons to work out?
  • Friend and fellow fitness pro, Ann Heizer succinctly says aging gracefully means “participating in all areas of your life functionally.”
  • From longtime friend, Kevin Moir we got a Hunter S. Thompson quote that turns “graceful” on its head:  “Life should not be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside in a cloud of smoke, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming ‘Wow! What a Ride!’”
  • “It means they have to pry my kiteboard out of my cold dead hands!” exclaims John Croteau whom we’ve known since first grade. Interesting how his definition also comes into play with the top fear from polltakers– not wanting to stop doing what you love.

Forget Aging Gracefully; Go For Gratefully

What do you think of this reworking of the phrase from Gigi Schilling, over at Over Fifty & Irresistible! in Facebook?

Gigi prefers to age gratefully instead of gracefully. “Aging gracefully is a bit demeaning to me. I prefer to age GRATEFULLY even though I also believe that GRACE is a must in everyone’s life at any age.”

pic of three Boomer friends

Friends Keep You Foxy Forever

Alexandra here to say that no-one told me I was supposed to age “gracefully.” In fact, I wasn’t even aware that I was “supposed” to age in any manner at all. Whatever the expectations were for my parents, they no longer apply. We are the generation that grew up being called “Foxy Ladies,” so I’m sticking with that self-concept and being clever as a fox. In other words, I’m using my mind every day to motivate my body to move so that all the Silver Foxes will be motivated to call me Foxy Lady when I’m 80. All it takes is a smile and confidence (and some knee surgery here and there). Survey that!!

Survey Summary

Overall, the results indicate that we boomers most fear losing our faculties and function. We are motivated by how we feel and function much more than how we look. Being hale and hearty ranks the highest. Now that’s what we call “Active Aging!”

Now please stay active and comment below. What’s your TOP numero uno reason for exercising?

1 2 3 14