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4

Create Great Baby Boomer Workouts: Part 4

Kymberly Balance Exercises Rancho la PuertaOver 50 and looking for ways to make your workouts the best ones possible? Welcome to Part 4 of a series sharing principles you can use to enhance your exercise program and life.  These principles are specifically helpful for baby boomers, whether newcomers to exercise or long time “activists.”

Before revealing Principle 5, let’s briefly recap the insider strategies I shared in Parts 1-3. Click on each link to access the relevant post. Just be sure to come back!

Principle 1: Activate Your Back

Principle 2: Train Using Functional Options

Principle 3:  Activate from the Middle to Extremities; from Inside, Out

Principle 4: Offer Movement Patterns that Enhance Cognitive Skills

And now for today’s peak performance principle:

Principle 5: Incorporate Dynamic and Static Balance Exercises

When you hear “balance options” do you think solely of static balance moves? “Stand still and lift one leg.” If so, time to add dynamic balance to your repertoire.  Coming up — lots of practical balance exercises you can play with.

Use variations on walking as a fun and functional balance warm up Click To Tweet

Walk This Way … and That

Kymberly Walking - Balance Exercises

Walking – the Ultimate Balance Exercise

Walking is the ultimate and primary functional balance move.  Use variations on walking as a fun and functional balance warm up. Try walking forward, backward, quickly with direction changes, slowly, super slowly. Then walk in one line as if on a balance beam going forward and back while lifting a knee up and over with each step. Also challenge yourself to go forward and in reverse toe to heel; heel to toe.

Another dynamic balance move that is also functional is heel walking. With toes lifted, walk around the room both forward and in reverse. Or take two steps up to an imaginary line with the heels down, toes up, then two steps back to start. Watch that you don’t hinge at the hips to counterbalance; keep your hips open and glutes under your shoulders, not behind them.

Improving Static Balance as Primary Goal

When selecting static balance exercises you have a range of moves to choose from. Assuredly, you’ll want to include a few options whereby you support on one leg while lifting, holding, moving the other (half static, half dynamic). In such cases, the balance exercise itself is the focus.

Balance Exercises KymberlyFor example, stand on the left leg while making figure eight loops in front and behind the body, clockwise and counterclockwise with the right leg.

Improving Static Balance as Secondary, Two-for-One Goal

You can create a time efficient, two-for-one coupon special by combining static balance challenges with upper body exercises.  In essence, any time you stand in place while doing another exercise, you have an opportunity to add a balance component.  Simply take advantage of varying stance options, progressing from a wide to narrow base of support.

For instance, if you are doing lat pulldowns with resistance tubing, rather than always default to a wide, parallel stance (feet about shoulder width apart in the same plane), narrow or stagger your feet. While your primary goal is to strengthen the lats, you are retraining your body and brain to account for a different base of support as a secondary benefit.

Stance Progression to Add to Balance Exercises

Your stance options in order of most secure to most challenging are as follows:

  1. Wide Stance Parallel (Most Common and offers Most Control)
  2. Wide Stance Staggered (one foot forward of the other, though not lined up)
  3. Narrow Stance Staggered
  4. Narrow Stance Parallel (Feet and Inner Thighs touching)
  5. Feet in one line but not heel to toe (ie, space between front and back foot)
  6. Tandem Stance (feet lined up one in front of the other, heel to toe (More Challenge)
  7. One foot resting on top of the other or 1 leg lifted (Most Challenge)
Stretching is also a great place and time to work in balance work Click To Tweet

Stagger or narrow the feet during upper body stretches. Stretching is also a great place and time to work in more balance work. Gently dropping your ear side to side while your feet are in tandem position requires new attention and adaptation.

Kymberly Balance Exercises Rancho la puerta

Really Stretching My Limits While Balancing

As you see, this principle is accessible and straightforward. Use it and any of the other principles to stimulate your creativity and rethink your workout content. Your body will thank you — your future, functional, energetic body!

ACTION: Principle #8 – Subscribe to get active aging insights written to help you enjoy the second half of life as energetically and comfortably as possible.

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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3

Create the Best Possible Over 50 Workouts: Part 2

Step, Kymberly Best baby boomer workouts

I (K)need to Step Aside

Baby Boomer Workouts

Do you have great things planned for your second half of  life?  Having said that, do you find yourself working around added aches and pains?  Are you making changes to your exercise program based on aging realities? I know I phased out kickboxing, high impact aerobics, and snowboarding based on ever worsening knee arthritis. (More at the end of the post on what’s about to happen with my knee in less than a week. Not a sob story, but some solutions so keep reading).  Yet I don’t want to give up my beloved step classes. Nor do I want any more injuries, limitations, or bad body mechanics.

Once we hit midlife, we need to create workouts that take into account principles that are targeted to our specific needs. Principles that inhibit bad body habits and encourage physical comfort and ability. Exercise design principles that I’ll be sharing with you in a short series.  Using even one of these principles will bring you to better, long term, wiser workouts. And you’ll catapult yourself to the insider, fitness pro mindset.

2nd of 6 Principles for Creating Great Baby Boomer Workouts

This post shares the second of six principles for creating outstanding workouts for baby boomers. Initially, I put together this list in a a cover feature for the leading fitness professional journal. Then I realized you active agers might want this helpful info as well.  To take advantage of the first principle go here:

Create the Best Workout Programs for Your Over 50 Body

Principle 2: Train Using Functional Options

More than any other age group, we midlife and older exercisers appreciate and need functional movement.

What Does “Functional Exercise” Really Mean?

Many definitions exist for functional movement, so let’s start with wikipedia’s: “Functional movements are based on real-world situational biomechanics. They usually involve multi-planar, multi-joint movements which place demand on the body’s core musculature and innervation.”  Come back. Don’t let me lose you.  In simple terms — choose exercises that involve several muscles and joints all-in-one.

Another common way to define functional exercise is to ascertain whether you can apply a given move to activities of daily living (ADLs). What moves do you perform in real life? Train for those. For example, do you need to get up and down from the ground? Do you pick up groceries from the floor and turn to put them away in an overhead cabinet?  Contrast this to single joint, isolated strength and muscular endurance training such as calf raises or triceps kickbacks. Instead, for example, perform an exercise that lifts a free weight left to right with rotation from low to high/ floor to overhead. Or perform squats that mimic ducking sideways under a rope or bar.

What Do You Want to DO with Your Fit Self?Planking in Australia

Like me, are you a boomer who is more interested in continuing activities you enjoy rather than worry about hypertrophy? Are you motivated to gain strength, power, and endurance so you can travel, take up new hobbies, keep up with grown children and grandchildren? If you value having energy over having a six-pack you are part of a trend. A majority of midlife exercisers are looking at their parents and making decisions about their own aging. We want to retain our physical and mental capabilities to the same or greater degree than our parents – and why not? Even more critical – let’s make sure fitness habits that might have worked in our youth aren’t causing pain in our middle years.

If you're more interested in continuing activities you enjoy rather than solely hypertrophy,… Click To Tweet

Will the exercises you choose help you climb steps, get up and down from chairs and the floor, prevent falls, turn to see behind you while driving? Do your moves help you continue surfing, hiking, camping? Think in terms of adding rotation, level changes (low to high and high to low), or working in opposition. Approach your workout design with the idea to help keep your world from shrinking. What are you worried about having to give up? What do you enjoy doing that you’d love to continue as long as possible? Train from that perspective and you will have better results and fewer physical challenges.

Good Riddance to Pain, Hello to Renewed Function

Speaking of physical challenges, I am heading into knee replacement surgery in a few days. Dealing with arthritic keen pain is one thing. Seeing my function diminish significantly these past months is another.  Part of my surgery prep plan involved:

  • Seeing how Alexandra fared with her replacement surgery last year. Helps to have an identical twin sister who moonlights as a mine canary. She came out both alive and with better, almost pain free function;
  • Biking more both indoors and out. In fact, I just completed my second Schwinn certificate training to teach indoor cycling;
  • Taking advantage of a timely offer from Omron to try their new HEAT Pain Pro TENS unit (yes they compensated me for this post. Disclosure Done!).

omron-tens-device

Give Me Some TENS, or Twenties or Fifties….

First I finally learned what TENS stands for:  transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation. I knew medical professionals for years have used TENS to treat pain. Now reliable, affordable products are becoming available for use at home. So home I went jiggity jog, packing heat. Without the jog. And with more than heat!

The Omron HEAT Pain Pro combines TENS and heat to help alleviate chronic pain and aching muscles. Warms and zaps all in one. Omron is calling my number on this one. Number TENS. (Insert laugh track here). My muscles and joints have made too many compensations serving the demands of my curmudgeonly knee. This new device was easy to use and did relieve muscle tension.  It didn’t eradicate my osteoarthritis. Ok, that might have been asking too much. Maybe Omron will  come out with a TWENTIES or FIFTIES device to handle that big of a job.

Anyway, my point is that this lightweight, portable device helped reduce muscle tension. Between teaching my fitness classes despite increasing knee pain (not recommended), walking my dogs every day, and wanting to enter surgery as relaxed as possible, I’ll take all the help I can get!

How Did the Canary in the Mine Fare?

Alexandra also tried the Omron HEAT Pain Pro, and found it definitely decreased some of the stiffness and discomfort from her knee replacement surgery. Even though the surgery was back in June, 2016, she still has some occasional swelling and stiffness after hard workouts. After undergoing electrical stimulation during physical therapy that could be quite uncomfortable, Alexandra was expecting this to be the same. Luckily, she discovered that the TENS was fairly mild. Her favorite setting is Combo 2- short session of alternating heat and TENS. She offers one suggestion: make the heat setting just a bit warmer. Overall, Alexandra was pleased with the pain relief that the HEAT Pain Pro provided to her knee.

There you have it. Ready to stick on the Omron device, reduce pain, plus create the best baby boomer workouts ever? Me too, right after knee surgery. See you on the other side.

ACTION: Usually we suggest you subscribe if you have not yet done so. This time we hope you click on the Omron link to check out whether the unit might help you. No aches, pains, or tension involved when you window shop.

Kymberly Williams-Evans

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Create the Best Workout Programs for Your Over 50 Body

This is My Year Best Workout ProgramsLet’s start the year successfully by designing the best workout programs for your bodacious baby boomer body!

How would you like to make your workouts even more effective, time-efficient, and specific to your midlife needs? Notice I did not say “harder” or “longer.” Are you with me?

Benefits of Designing the Best Workout Programs for Boomers

You can create cutting edge, life-enhancing fitness programs that are low risk, yet high reward by taking into account any of 6 principles honed for the over 50 exerciser. Maintain function and expand, not shrink your capabilities as you age actively with smarter exercises.

Boomers: want to make your workouts more effective, time-efficient, and specific to midlife needs Click To Tweet

We boomers — who range from 53-71 years old — want to enjoy the second half of life actively, comfortably, and energetically. Yet we have five to seven decades of accumulated aches and pains. Joint issues may limit your ability to do high impact activities. I know my arthritic knees definitely affect my movement choices.

1st of 6 Principles

Over the course of the next few weeks and blog posts, I will share 6 of 7 principles I’ve devised based on research, experience, and training that are particularly helpful to our age group. You are getting the professional insider advice from a cover feature article I just had published in IDEA Fitness Journal, the industry publication for fitness pros.

20161230_143942

The 6 principles can be used in any combination or as standalones. Apply one, two, or all six to a given exercise; use three principles total in one session and a different three in another; focus on one principle one day and another the next. Regardless of how you mix and match the principles, you will reap the benefits.

Over 50? Create cutting edge, life-enhancing fitness pgms that R low risk, high reward using… Click To Tweet

Principle 1: Activate Your Back

Have years of sitting, driving — of living life in front of your body — produced forward head misalignment, rounded shoulders, hunched posture, overly stretched or a weak back?

Best workout Programs

Hip Extension in another dimension

The “Activate Your Back” principle reminds us to prioritize actions behind us. Incorporate exercises that require glutes, hamstrings, any and all back muscles. Look for every opportunity to open or extend the pectorals (chest), anterior deltoids (front of shoulder), and hip flexors.

A focus on dorsal or backside moves counteracts prior decades of movement patterns that close off the front of the body. If you take cardio classes, think of this principle as a chance to give your heart and lungs more room to pump and breathe. Even if your teacher is cueing arm patterns in front of your body, try arm movements such as rows, hand to heel lifts behind the back, or any move than puts the arms behind you.

For strength, balance, or stretch classes, choose exercises with hip extension (open hip, leg reaching behind you) over ones promoting hip flexion (closed hip, leg in front of you). For instance, if doing balance work, have your lifted leg start and stay in hip extension. Then slightly raise and lower that leg using the glutes. Add in small loops, counter- and clockwise, all in the dorsal plane — that is, behind you. Or lift your leg only a few inches from the start position to the left and right, tapping lightly side to side, again always with hip extension. Not only do you use your core muscles to compress and stabilize to hold your upper body position, but also you reinforce good posture.

Any time you have a chance to open the front of your body and use the back, go for that choice! Time to put more behind us! Life metaphor, right?

For more on how you can pursue the best workout programs for yourself, check out these posts:

Best Workouts for Women Over 50: 7 Age-Relevant Training Principles

Women Over 50 – We Are NOT Aging Healthfully

Fit Over 50? Achieve it with These 6 Age Specific Tips

Action: Subscribe to receive pro tips to stay fit as you age actively. Need we say more. 

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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6

Top Quotes and Insider Fitness Trends for Boomers-2016

This is My Year Fitness Trends for BoomersFitness Trends for Boomers

Is it time to make your workouts even better, beloved baby boomers? Then get your insider insights right here. Step right up. Literally.

Who likes to be out in front? And I’m not talking cleavage or bellies here. If you’re ready to take advantage of the latest findings in the fitness world, then hang onto your stretchy legging waistbands.  Let’s zip together through some of the key highlights, workout tips, and quotes from the recent IDEA World Fitness Convention.

Take on some of these takeaways to enter the next year even more prepared to redefine active aging for our generation and the generations to come.

Reports from the IDEA World Fitness Convention

Alexandra and I just returned from this primary industry event for fitness professionals from around the world. In her capacity as a roving editor for IDEA, Alexandra attended a range of sessions. (See her reports here: 5 Trends from the IDEA Fitness Convention and Diversity and Collaboration Mark Key Themes). I had the honor to be both a presenter and attendee, with my keen eyes focused on sessions specifically for the over fifty crowd. (Add these other key midlife workout themes to your life and really soar).

Let’s jump to the head of class with a romp through some trends from the industry’s leaders.

Top Two Medical Conditions Adults Over 50 Have

From “Functional Power Training for Older Adults” led by Cody Sipe, PhD

Fitness trends for boomers at IDEA, K and A

Alexandra was inspired to whack Kymberly with her cane. No wonder we both have osteoarthritis.

Cody’s opening statement motivated me (as an over 50 personage myself): “Exercise has the ability to change older adults’ aging trajectory.” Knew it, but can always use the kick in the formerly tight, toned tushie of mine. Raise your hand if you want to disrupt your aging trajectory.

What do we need to add to our workouts? First, Cody asked us if we knew the two main conditions experienced by older adults? Turns out the top two are hypertension and osteoarthritis.  Oh yeah, I hear you Cody My Man. (Say I with the knee arthritis and sister who just had total knee replacement). Ok, so we have to account for these conditions while working to prevent them from limiting our lives. 

Next he posed the question: “Without training specifically to prevent it, which function do we lose with age more than muscular strength and muscle mass?” The answer surprised me as I know the (not so happy) stats on muscles loss in our aging population. You ready for it? Power, defined as the ability to move a load quickly. In addition to training for strength, we midlifers also need to focus on velocity and force of movement. In other words, it’s time to increase speed of motion while reducing the load when we consider a total resistance training right for our bodies. According to Cody, we’re past time if we pass our prime without power (Uh, I made up that exact wording as I kinda like how it encapsulates Cody’s point).

How Do Strength and Power Affect Your Daily Life?

Let’s put this into practical application and context of our daily activities:

  • Strength allows us to carry groceries; Power allows us to prevent falls.
  • Strength helps us pick up grandkids; Power kicks in when we grab our grandkids out of danger’s way.
  • Strength gets our luggage up and into the overhead bin; Power serves us to transport that luggage from A to B. If you’ve ever traveled to China, let me say that A to B at their train stations includes only stairs — no ramps, elevators, escalators, or handy porters. Yes, this is personal experience talking. Our mom took Alexandra and me to China and Tibet a decade ago. She needed help with her luggage, which gave us lots of opportunity to develop our power as mom does not pack lightly and the A to B connections in China seem about a continent apart. Pant pant sweat sweat. I did my power training for a decade on that journey!

What’s the workout takeaway here? You finally get the official clearance to lift light weights — as long as you add speed to those moves! Therefore, it’s time to do some lifts, jumps, and throws my midlife buddies if you want to retain power and change your aging trajectory!

You Can’t Really Stay in One Place: You’re Either Going Forwards or Backwards

Kymberly and Alexandra post bike ride Fitness trends for boomers

Going forwards, backwards, and upwards.

Using Function to Avoid Dysfunction, presented by Mark Kelly, PhD, CSCS

Mark is the living example of how lean, fit, funny, energetic, and functional an over 50 year old can be.  I was so busy taking notes that I took no picture of him. However, take my word for it that he turned his aging trajectory around big time!

Not only was his session loaded with great moves to improve function, but also he had some great quotes relative to movement that you may also enjoy.

  • “Not going forwards is going backwards.”
  • “Not going backwards is going forwards.”
  • “If functional ability measures aging, and exercise increases functional ability, then exercise counters aging.” I know, I know — you already knew that, especially if you’ve been reading our blog for any time. But Mark puts the case so succinctly and it’s a good reminder.

If you want to try out some of the clever, fun, brain and body smart moves Mark introduced, then join my group fitness classes in Santa Barbara. Come on Fridays when I try out the good stuff on my fit-tastic and amazing class participants. They’re the ones saying “warn us next time you go to the IDEA Convention.”

Live Long: Die Short

Fitness Trends for Boomers

Try these trends to be MORE fit!

Let’s leave Mark’s session with the question he opened with:

“Are we living longer or simply dying slower?”  

In a separate post, you’ll get the the direct pipeline to more happiness, less stress, and a more self-loving you, courtesy of award-winning presenter, Petra Kolber.  Her session “Heavily Meditated and Highly Motivated” had a lot of quick, easy, powerful meditations I am eager to share with you.   Meditation is a HUGE option and one of the biggest fitness trends for boomers as more research comes out about its benefits. For now, let’s take our leave with a reminder from Petra that I hope will have you adding power to your active life:

  • “Don’t exchange what you want most for what you want at the moment.”

ACTION: We hope you want most and at this moment is to subscribe to our twice weekly posts that bring you active aging tips and inspiration. Enter your email in any of the subscription boxes; claim a bonus while you’re at it.

4

Fitness Trends and 3 Themes for Older Adults

Kymberly w/ step at club

Who else wants to be a baby boomer exercising trendsetter?

Fitness Goals for Older Adults and the Over 50 Exerciser: Are Your Goals Listed?

Fitness for Older Adults, my title slide from IDEA

Title slide from my IDEA session

How many times have you thought, “I want to improve my fitness program, but NOT the hard core one I did when I was younger?” As a baby boomer or older adult are you looking for intelligent, effective, yet comfortable exercise options? Do you worry about losing cognitive skills, getting hurt, gaining weight, losing strength, and not being able to do activities you love? At the same time, do you like to know that your workout and exercise choices are smart ones? Perhaps even cutting edge and trending?

Then the themes and trends I experienced (and contributed to) at the recent IDEA World Fitness Convention will help you meet your goals. (For my sister’s take on overall fitness trends, take a peek at “5 Trends from the Annual IDEA Convention.”)

Kymberly at IDEA - over 50, older adultsMy focus was first on doing well in my own session as a presenter.  I shared 7 principles for creating outstanding group programs for baby boomers. You get 3 of them here! Then I attended every other session devoted to the over 50 exerciser, especially the more active movers and groovers (as opposed to sessions devoted to the frail and elderly).  

2 Fitness Trends Plus a Bonus for Older Adults Who Read all of this Post

The biggest trend I saw was the very fact that fitness pros from around the world are FINALLY interested in serving the over 50 exerciser – specifically, in a targeted way. My session, “Fitness Over 50: Getting ReStarted” was filled to capacity. Yay! And the other presentations devoted to our age group were also packed. Heck, this year IDEA offered the most sessions ever devoted to the midlifer and older adult. That’s related to trend #2 – IDEA and the various presenters for this age group finally separated the “older exerciser” into two distinct groups: the baby boomers (ages 52-70) and the seniors or “matures” who are 70+. Prior to this year anyone 50-100 was lumped into one category.

If you are curious about other trends for our age group, read my take on the Top 10 Fitness Trends for 2016

Top 10 Fitness Trends: Aging Actively is SOooo 2016

Trend #1 - fitness focus on the over 50 exerciser is finally cool and Hawt! #activeaging Click To Tweet

Improve Your Own Workouts Based on these Trends and Themes

What were some key fitness themes and workout design principles for older adults as evidenced at the IDEA Convention? How can you incorporate them into your workouts? The following 3 themes, or guiding principles will help you create the best workouts for your midlife body.  These principles are adapted from my session, which must have been trendy as all the other “older adult” presenters alluded to them as well.

Use these 3 guiding principles to create the best workouts for your midlife body. #babyboomers… Click To Tweet

If you weave in even one or two of these themes, you will be able to:

  1. Create targeted fitness programs that are low risk, yet yield high rewards;
  2. Offer moves specific to your cognitive and physical needs as an older adult;
  3. Move from stuck or unstarted to strong.

3 Fitness Themes for the Over 50 Exerciser

Crossing midline

One of our BoomChickaBoomers crossing her midline

  1. Choose Movement Patterns that Enhance your Cognitive and Physical Skills

Why not get a two-fer benefit with each exercise choice? Look for opportunities to cross the midline of your body with an arm, leg or both at once.

Move to music that has polyrhythms or beats that are more complex than straight count.

Attend workout classes where the instructor cues patterns. The brain work involved in interpreting verbal commands and following choreography literally increases your dendrites, ganglia, and axons.

  1. Choose Functional Movement Options

Ask yourself whether the moves you are choosing relate to activities of daily living (ADL). For instance, incorporate dynamic balance moves, not solely static ones since we normally need to balance while moving, not holding still. Recognize walking as the ultimate and primary balance and functional move.  So take walks. And when you do, test your balance by intermittently slowing your stride. Super slow. Then speed up. Super fast.

Training for travel, older adult

Planking at the Sydney Opera House was part of my travel plan

Let’s say you have a plan to travel. Keep in mind that especially in foreign countries  you’ll be climbing stairs; walking on uneven terrain; navigating unfamiliar environments; carrying loads, dealing with fatigue and time changes. Plan to be your active best when traveling by making stepping up and down part of your workout program. Or lifting your legs up and over things so you’ll be ready for those low walls abroad.Practice twisting and turning while carrying weights (luggage, souvenirs, small grandchildren).

Do you include posture work in your routine? If not, it’s tiiiiime. Which do you think will have a bigger impact on your ability to age actively — having popping fresh biceps (single joint strength training isolation move) or having a strong core and back that keep you lifted and long? (Yeah, the opposite of stooped with rounded shoulders).

  1. Challenge Your Balance

kayaking on Whiskeytown Lake An older adult aging actively

An activity I enjoy.

Use balance work as a move itself or as a stance option for any standing move. Not only could you incorporate balance moves into your workout, but also you can improve your balance while working your upper body or doing standing stretches. How? But narrowing your stance. Don’t always set your feet shoulder width apart and parallel. Instead, place one foot directly in front of the other in what’s called “tandem” position. Now try those tricep kickbacks or upper body stretch. Trickier right? Whenever possible choose a narrow vs wide base of support.

Are you already rethinking your program? Less working one muscle at a time and more enhancing your overall ability to move and continue doing the activities you enjoy?

QUESTION: Would you be interested in a digital product that offered moves and workout programs that follow the themes listed here?  If we created videos and support text that allowed you to mix and match effective programs with balance, posture, and functional exercises, would you value that?

ACTION: While pondering the above, why not subscribe if you aren’t already part of our community? Enter your email in any of the opt-in boxes plus claim your bonus booklet.

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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4

Is Your Fitness Plan in “Stuck” not “Start”?

Boomers on the Loose graphic

Be Loose, Not Stuck!

Do You Need to Move Your Fitness Plan from Stuck to Start?

Arrrrghhh! That’s the sound of you spending another day stuck in sedentary patterns stitched with good exercise intentions. Another day of you bartering with yourself in an Annie mood that “tomorrow, tomorrow, I love you tomorrow” the sun will come out and shine differently on your workout and fitness plan. But no actual exercise has occurred on a consistent (or even intermittent) basis. How many “tomorrows” have come and gone that you now admit, yup, you’re stuck and need a prod to get going. As in “today!”

From Nothing to Something; From Some to Some More

Let’s say you used to work out, or never did, but remember it seemed like a good idea. You’re not alone. A common request we get is how to go from park to cruise mode; from inactive to active; from nuffink much to sumpin. Note I did not say to zoom from 0 to 60 off the starting line.

Start Small

In fact, starting small is one of our key pieces of advice. We’re going to share some action items that are so easy to implement you’ll be asking yourself, “Why didn’t I do this sooner?”

Take off the pressure of trying to change several health habits at once. Instead, do this Click To Tweet

Take off the pressure of trying to change several health habits all at once. That’s putting more weight on your shoulders than we’d recommend for a strength training program! Go step by step. Learn to enjoy movement and the youthful vibrancy it brings.

Old Fashioned Whoop Ass

Need a kick in the keester to get unstuck?

Say So Long Suckahs to Sedentary Stuckness

Kymberly: Transitioning to an active, healthy lifestyle is simpler than you think. Kiss frustration good-bye. Tackling just one of the items on the following checklist will progress you. Find one action you can complete today. Do it right away and check it off! You will move from inertia to energy in less than 5 minutes.

Alexandra: Can I at least have some French Vanilla ice cream with my inertia? And I didn’t know his name was Frustration when I kissed him. But I’d do it all again anyway.

Kymberly: For you, sis, you may partake of the can of Whoop Ass included in this post. For the rest of you, forget fitness trends, celebrity endorsements, or what you used to do when you were younger.

Fitness Over 50 - Get your fitness plan unstuck

Title slide of a presentation I offered fitness pros.

8 Easy Ways to Get Unstuck Starting … Now! When Else?

  1. Identify a space in your home where you can work out, even if it’s just big enough to fit a mat or towel on the floor.
  2. Forget the all or nothing, “practice makes perfect” approach. Practice makes progress. Practice makes permanent. Practice creates habits. Perfection is overrated and unsustainable. Simply do a little bit more than the day before.
  3. Set your expectations low to start. What’s the least you can do and commit to today? Tomorrow?
  4. Drink water. Instead of sugary drinks or ones that have the word “latte,” or “fountain” in them, or whipped cream, or carbonation combined with a can. See where I am going with this?  Being well water-drated will also minimize muscle soreness and fatigue.  Thats’ a twofer special right there!
  5. Find moves and activities you enjoy. This has been a recording. Beeeeep. Ever wonder why we named our blog “Fun and Fit?” Because we believe that movement can be enjoyable; that an active life is more appealing than a sedentary one; AND that at least some of the exercise you do has to be fun so you will actually do it. Oh, and because my sister is actually pretty funny. Yes, those of us who have crossed over to the other side know that it is more fun to move and groove than it is to think about it. And it definitely is not fun to force ourselves to perform exercises we hate. Bleeeeech! (as Mad Magazine used to say).
8 Easy Ways to Get Unstuck with your fitness plan Starting … Now! When Else? Click To Tweet
  1. Find a community to support you or at least one that will hold you accountable. Whether you pick someone in person, online, or long distance, make a pact with at least one other support person with whom you will actually check in. Maybe you’ll even find a workout buddy.
  2. Use technology if that works for you. Don’t use the lack of a pedometer, wrist tracking device, calorie counter or any other wearable technology as an excuse NOT to start. We are not Waiting for Godot or Go Pro around here. Just get out there with or without the latest gear. The lack of a device is not an obstacle to movement. However, if the presence of any wearable technology helps you giddy up, why then use it! Strap on and keep on truckin’!
  3. Have a restart Plan B. You will not meet your goals each day. That’s no reason  to give up. And by “reason” I mean “excuse.” Get back to the mat or gym or trail. Be prepared for the common, usual, and totally human reality that you will have “fail” days. What is your contingency plan when you get off track? Let’s hope it at least includes forgiving yourself, and looking to the future rather than berating the past.

Does one of the above actions speak to you? Then listen. And go for it.  You need implement just one item to get unstuck and on the path to new active aging habits.

Find 1 action you can check off today to move from inertia to energy in less than 5 minutes. Click To Tweet

Sales image for TransformAging

Time for Some TransformAging?

ACTION If you want even more support and ideas to transform yourself to a more fit you, then check out this cutting edge resource. Click to access the TransformAging page. The session “(Re)Starting Fitness Over 50” in particular is LOADED with strategies to get you happily and successfully going. And liking it!

By Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

8

Top 10 Fitness Trends: Aging Actively is SOooo 2016

Top Ten Fitness Trends

And the Top 10 Fitness Trends are…

Who loves tracking fitness trends? (Besides my sis and me, though we’d love to think we start them). Are you a baby boomer fitness trendsetter or trendspotter? Perhaps you’re simply waiting to figure out what other women over 5o are doing that’s working so you know where to direct your exercise energy. Clever of you, for sure!

Time to Track Fitness Trends

It’s that time of year again when we track down workout, exercise, and fitness trends and fill you in. Why? So you can be your best, most actively aging, up-to-date you. Is that too much to ask?

Who loves spotting fitness trends? Especially for active women over 50 and baby boomers? Top 10… Click To Tweet
NACAD fitness trends talk at WAC

Thanks, I do feel welcomed. Now let’s trendset!

In prepping for a presentation on fitness trends for the North Atlantic Club Athletic Director Association’s conference held in Seattle at the Washington Athletic Club (WAC), I discovered a slew of predictions. The following promise to be of particular interest to actively aging midlife women:

Five that Jive and Keep us Alive

  1. Programs tailored to older adults.
  2. Functional fitness training — emphasis on moves and group classes that mimic or enhance activities of daily living, including balance, strength, and power.
  3. Wearable technology for many purposes — to measure physiological responses to training, track workouts, monitor caregiving of our aging parents, to name just a few examples.
  4. Experiences as a driving factor to exercise, not just working out to work out. Perhaps the biggest example is those of us who exercise in order to travel. Baby boomers are traveling like no generation before or currently. And we don’t want to sit on the bus, either! Midlife adventure travel is going up, up, up just like the airplanes carrying us to new destinations.
  5. Educational workshops for exercisers, who are looking for intellectual fulfillment as well as physical.  Have you attended a talk at your club, gym or spa? You’re a trendsetter!

Besides the fad that may become a trend of me trying to hold my abs engaged, you get five more fitness trends for 2016:

Five to Thrive

  1. Demand for educated, experienced, certified fitness professionals. (While I was surprised to see this as a trend, I suuuuuure do welcome it. Women over 50 are smart enough to demand qualified pros, not to be seduced by celebrities and social media darlings whose main qualifications are lots of followers on pinterest and revealing photos on instagram. No, I’m not covetous of those ripped abs. Well, not enough to actually do much about it. I’m busy. …….. Busy relaxing and researching trends).
  2. Healthy food choices as a renewed focus, especially looking at eating habits that enhance our brains, are more resource conscious, and serve social values. Contrast this to the past 50 years of making eating decisions based on convenience and/ or weight loss.
  3. kayaking on Whiskeytown LakeOutdoor activity. Do you see where this dovetails with the travel plans boomers have?
  4. Brain boosting movement. As we watch our parents suffer from memory loss, cognitive decline, and dementia, a whole heckuvalot of us baby boomers are saying “nuh uh” to that. Given the advances in medical technology (MRIs, brain scans) and neuroplasticity, we can now train the brain while bolstering the body. Who doesn’t love a twofer?
  5. Spa visits. This trend was another surprise for me given the recent recession. Apparently we are spending billions on destination resorts, day spas, walk in treatments, wellness retreats and the like. Much as personal training shifted from a luxury for the wealthy to a mainstream “need” for the middle class, spa treatments are undergoing a similar reappraisal. Again, baby boomers are leading the way as we redefine body work as a health and wellness enhancer, not just a pampered relaxation moment.
2 of these top 10 fitness trends surprised us. Click To Tweet
Fitness trends presentation for WAC

What my talk for WAC covers: Yak, yak, yak, hope they ask me back!

If you did your brain boosting exercises, which you monitored on your wearable technology outdoors at a resort after a healthy meal, then you’d see that the above 5 + 5 trends get us to the promised 10. Ta dum! Over and out — to move and look for more trends.

If you wonder which prior years’ trend predictions came true or fizzled, go here: Want to Know Top Insider Fitness Trends and Quotes?

and here: 5 Healthy Food Trends

and also here: Exercise Trends for the Over 50 Crowd

Heck, why not be the most informed trendtracker EVAH and also go here: I’m Spa-tacus and Other Spa Industry Trends

ACTION: Subscribe to get more, be more, live more. Need we say more? Enter your email and name in any of the boxes.

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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3

3 Exercises to Strengthen & Support the Knee

If you need to strengthen the muscles that support the knee, you’ll want to try these three knee exercises. No equipment is needed except your own determination. And possibly a mat or bed.

seated knee extensionI had a knee replaced a month ago, so need to retrain my muscles and knee to work together. Our mom is wary of falling, so she needs to keep her legs strong in order to get up and down safely. And some of our students are new to exercise and need some basic exercises that don’t require weights or a machine. Voila! These will help.


Straight Leg Raise
Tighten muscles on front of thigh, then lift leg 8-10 inches from the bed or mat, keeping knee locked. Note: For most exercises that we teach, we encourage our students to have a “soft,” slightly bent knee. This particular exercise does require the locked knee.

Terminal Knee Extension
In the video I am lying supine (on my back), but you can also prop yourself up on your elbows, as long as you lift the chest and lengthen the neck.
With the knee bent over a bolster (or pillows), straighten the knee by tightening the muscles on top of the thigh. Move only from the knee down, keeping the hips on the bed or mat, and the back of the knee on the bolster. Hold for 3 seconds if possible before lowering.

Seated Knee Extension
Sit with legs hanging off the side of a bed or chair, preferably without feet touching the floor. Tighten the muscles of the thigh, then bend at the knee to lift the lower leg up to a straight leg position. Keep the hips down.

Try to do 10 repetitions of each exercise. Once you’ve gotten that, add a second set of ten, with a short break in between sets.

3 Exercises to help strengthen & support the knee. #Exercise #FitFluential Click To Tweet

If you are recovering from knee replacement surgery as I am, you will promptly ice your knee and take a nap after these exercises. Oh, yes indeed.

Alexandra Williams, MA

10

Challenges to Healthy Aging for Older Adults

At the Jamba Juice FitExpo

Acting my age and older

5 Worrisome Problems Facing Older Adults and Baby Boomers. Bonus challenge #6 = Don’t call us “old people.”

What would you do with 30 extra years of life? Give those 30 years back?

If you are like some of the older adults in the Forever Fit Cardio fitness classes I teach, you don’t necessarily want 30 years added to your lifespan. And these are active adults in their 60s-80s, so imagine what inactive people might say to living to 100 and beyond. And yet, it is possible to greet such an offer with delight, not dread, especially if you embrace healthy aging and dispel some common misconceptions.

Redefine How You Age?

He's all about active, healthy aging for older adults

Colin Milner, CEO of ICAA Have you been Colinized?

The worry about adding years to life without adding life to those years is well-founded. When we interviewed  highly recognized active aging expert, Colin Milner,  founder of the International Council on Active Aging (ICAA), he laid out some interesting stats and scenarios facing our baby boomer population.

According to Milner, the US and Canada have shoveled out trillions of dollars to increase longevity. And that effort has been quite successful: we North American humans have added an average of 30 additional years to our lives in just one century. That jump is bigger than the one my sister did when a tick landed on her during a dog walk the other day. The problem with the lifespan jump is that those added years are not proving to be healthy ones. Suuuuuu-prise, suuuu-prise. Or not really a surprise at all to those of us who work with or are older adults.

Basically, as we age, we baby boomers and our parents face 5 key challenges. Can you guess what they are?

Dog hike

Young dog, new tricks. Old dog, more new tricks!

Top 5 Challenges Facing Baby Boomers and our Parents

  1. Listening to and buying into ageist stereotypes and myths. Examples: Once we cruise past our 50s and 60s, we are destined to slow down. You can’t teach an old dog new tricks. Or white knee socks look good with sandals.  Yeah, I made up that last one.
  2. Sinking into social isolation. Colin depressed us with the fact that by 2020 depression is projected to be the second leading cause of disability and death; By 2050, depression is predicted to be the number one cause. I may have paid more attention to that cute boy, Andrew in my math class than to actual math, but even I can see that we are talking ‘bout my generation! Who? No, the Who. If you got that song reference, you are in the social isolation demographic.
  3. Having a history of unhealthy lifestyle behaviors.
  4. Sticking with habits; repeating behaviors that are ingrained; aka No Longer Learning
  5. Looking always for quick fixes. Learning to manage aging changes takes time, effort, and patience, whether those changes are physical, financial, or otherwise. Apparently we are young enough to still want instant results. Or is that just me? Did you answer yet? How about now?
Baby boomers & our parents face 5 key challenges as we age. Can you name even 1? Click To Tweet

Super Sensible Solutions for the Projected Problems

For each problem, Colin Milner offers a corresponding suggestion. (Could be why his nickname is “the Colonizer.”) While he confesses that his advice may seem simple, he stresses that putting it into practice takes effort and focus. Making a plan to age in a healthy, “new thinking” way is hard. Yet aging inactively is harder.

In fact, as a generation, we are NOT aging healthfully. Read about it here: Women Over 50: We are NOT aging healthfully

Top 5 things you can do to age well (even after a lifetime of yuck, blah, & bad habits Click To Tweet

Top 5 Solutions to Healthy Aging for Older Adults

  1. Stay alert to stereotypes so you can be aware of them, then question them, then decide whether to ignore them.
  2. Vow to fight isolation, for yourself and others. Find people who are isolated and interact. You will save two birds with one phone! Colin urges us to find something we can start now. Go to a group fitness class today; call a neighbor today; sign up for an adult education class now.
  3. Look now for one habit you can change for the better. Rather than looking back at decades of unhealthy choices, look at today for one behavior to improve.
    Jamba Juice event and Alexandra

    Oh Behave, Alexandra! With healthy behaviors.

  4. Expand your knowledge and skills, Ask “why” a lot. Be curious.
  5. Anticipate and manage changes. Ask yourself “what works?” and implement more of that.

All in all, the key is to be proactive in order to age actively. Whew! That’s a lot of action. But not yet enough, as what we ultimately need to do is create a plan for today and the added tomorrows. We can redefine how we age, writing a new and better ending for ourselves and history. As Colin asks, “What is your plan?” What expectations do you have — of yourself, your health, your future, your present? In short, what will you do with your 30 added years?

Want to be an active aging superstar? How? Read this post: What Do You Enjoy About Aging?

ACTION: Make a realistic,fact-based, achievable active aging plan today by subscribing to our site.  Enter your email in any of the subscription boxes and snag your free bonus.

HOT NEWS: Speaking of the International Council on Active Aging, I was one of 30 national fitness leaders selected to present at their Nov 2016 Reimagine Aging conference taking place in Orlando. My topic? “Integrate Function and Cognitive Challenges into Your Older-adult Fitness Group.” In a nutshell, move, think, do both at once.”  Am I qualified? Decide for yourself by reading this post: Midlife Funtional Aging Specialists

Really be impressed with how much you will learn and benefit from the cutting edge advice of Colin Milner and others who specialize in healthy aging for older adults. Take a gander at our TransformAging package. Seriously, don’t simply grow old when you can age actively! Costs nothing to check out this link: TransformAging Summit

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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11

How to Improve Your Brain Today

Skyflying in LA - Kymberly

Lifting My Brain Power and Spirits

Move Your Body to Improve Your Cognition

Scared you’ll lose your memory, mental acuity, or brain function as you age? Have you watched an older loved one’s mental faculties decline, hoping this will not be you one day? Forget hoping and start moving as you have more control over your future brain power than you ever knew.

Exercise Your Way to More Smarts

Cardio exercise has officially moved into #1 spot for best thing you can do for your brain Click To Tweet

Cardio exercise has officially moved into the number one spot for “the best thing you can do for your brain” (AARP Bulletin, Get Moving for a Healthy Brain, Sept 2013, pgs 12-13). Take that crossword puzzles, foreign languages, and musical instruments! (Also touted as great vehicles to boost brain power, but downshifted out of first place given the latest research).

If you want to keep smart, cut your risk of Alzheimer’s in half, repair brain cell damage, and basically grow a bigger brain, you’ve got to dance, baby, dance! Face facts midlifers and baby boomers — if you do not eke out at least 150 minutes of cardio per week, your brain actually shrinks every year post 40, year after sedentary year.

Perform 150 minutes of cardio per week, to prevent your brain from shrinking post 40 years Click To Tweet

Devote 150 Minutes to Add Life to Your Years and to What Lies Between Your Ears

But if you want to increase your brain size and capability — cue harps and trumpets —  then find a way to work in about 22 aerobic minutes each day.  Or 50 minutes three times a week. Or 75 minutes twice a week. I can do this math for you because I boosted my brain teaching step class and walking my dogs. We’re easy around here how you get to the total and new studies support that ease. Sure walking for weight loss is wonderful (read our post on what walking can do for you). Walking for brain gain is even more powerful and impactful! Or try dancing, swimming, getting on a treadmill, biking, hiking, gardening even (could this be any easier? No I am not going to include watching Dancing With the Stars on this list even though I admit total fanaticism for the show.) It really does not take much time or effort to succeed with a brain fitness program.

TV Watching with the remote and a beer. Feet up

No

powerwalking in winter at Lake Tahoe

Yes

Maybe

Maybe.  Never sure whether Alexandra is good for your brain or not. heh heh

Get a Sexy, Tantalizing Hippocampus

Let me stress again how powerful movement is for your brain — each and every time you exercise, you get a bigger hippocampus (that’s sexy talk for the post 50 crowd); you stimulate the growth of new neurons; you cut your risk of dementia by 60 percent. Can I get a rah rah here with a pom pom thrown in please?

The better your brain, the better your life. Move to think and live better Click To Tweet

Dr Michale Luan yoga pose with fitness ball

Dr Michael Luan Balances Body and Brain

As Dr. Michael Luan, a friend and expert on Conscious Movement puts it, “We exercise to become better humans. Conscious Movement evolves your brain. The body is your ultimate tool for success, and we all have the potential for greatness. Success with your body creates success with your career, relationships, and ultimately, your life.”  The better your brain, the better your life, wouldn’t you say?

Movement will improve your focus, increase your mood, enhance your decision-making processes, help your ability to plan, regenerate brain cells, help your memory, and basically outsmart all those young people who can’t believe how sharp you are for a person your age.

ACTION: Improve your brain and body at least twice a week when you subscribe to our blog. Enter your email and claim your free bonus while you’re at it.

Sign up to start "youthifying" today.

Kymberly Williams-Evans, MA

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